UNESCO: Every Person Must Visit these 18 Greek Monuments

UNESCO advises travellers to Greece to visit 18 monuments that are an absolute must as World Heritage Monuments.

UNESCO has branded a total 1,073 sites as World Heritage Monuments, and 18 of them are located in Greece:

The Acropolis: The Parthenon and the other buildings on the Athenian hill – known also as “the sacred rock” – are masterpieces of classical architecture. Completed in 5th Century BC, they are still influential in blending harmonic architecture with natural surroundings.

Aigai (modern-day Vergina): The first capital of the Kingdom of Macedon, home of Alexander the Great, and burial ground of his father, Philip II of Macedon. It is decorated with mosaics and stuccoes and has a burial ground with over 300 and remains that are fairly well-preserved.

Delphi: The sanctuary of Delphi, home of the oracle of Apollo, sits at the foot of Mount Parnassus. It was the spiritual center of the Greek world.

Mystras: The well-preserved medieval city of Mystras played a central role in the final years of the Byzantine Empire.

Olympia: The location of the ancient Olympic Games in Peloponnese beginning in 776 BC. In addition to numerous temples and sanctuaries, it contains the remains of its famous stadium.

Mycenae and Tiryns: The most important cities of Mycenean Greece, flourishing between the 15th and 12th centuries BC. The Lion’s Gate and Treasury of Atreus at Mycenae have been listed as “outstanding examples of human creative genius”.

Delos: The sacred island that was the birthplace of Apollo and Artemis, according to mythology. Other than a pan-Hellenic sanctuary, was also a prosperous trading port.

Monastery of Saint John: The island of Patmos is believed to be the place where Saint John the Theologian wrote his Gospel and the Apocalypse. The monastery was founded in the 10th century and has served as a place of pilgrimage.

Medieval City of Rhodes: Built by The Order of St John of Jerusalem, it is one of the most impressive urban complexes of the Gothic period.

Monasteries of Daphni, Hosios Loukas and Nea Moni of Chios: The three monasteries in three different locations share the same aesthetics. Lavishly decorated in the 11th and 12th centuries are all exquisite examples of the ‘second golden age of Byzantine art’.

Old Town of Corfu: Strategically positioned at the entrance of the Adriatic Sea, the Ionian island had three forts designed by renowned Venetian engineers to protect the maritime trading interests of the Republic of Venice.

Paleochristian and Byzantine monuments of Thessaloniki: Fine churches built from the 4th to the 15th century.

Pythagoreion and Heraion of Samos: Pythagoreion was an ancient fortified port, marked by several civilizations that inhabited the Aegean island since the 3rd millennium BC. Heraion was the temple of the Samian Hera.

Sanctuary of Asklepios at Epidaurus: The shrine of Asklepios, god of medicine, was built during the 6th century BC at the latest. The temple of Asklepios, the Tholos and the Theatre – considered one of the purest masterpieces of Greek architecture – dated from the 4th century.

Temple of Apollo Epicurius at Bassae: The temple to the god of healing and the sun was built towards the middle of the 5th century BC. It stands in the heights of the mountains of Arcadia.

Meteora: The inaccessible sandstone peaks, like ‘columns of the sky’, host monasteries from the 11th century onwards. Twenty-four of these monasteries were built, despite incredible difficulties, at the time of the great revival of the eremetic ideal in the 15th century.

Mount Athos: An Orthodox spiritual center since 1054, Mount Athos has enjoyed an autonomous statue since Byzantine times. There are about 20 monasteries inhabited by some 1,400 monks. The ‘Holy Mountain’, which is forbidden to women and children, is also a recognized artistic site that has influenced Orthodox art.

Philippi: The walled city in the present-day region of Eastern Macedonia was founded in 356 BC by the Macedonian King Philip II. Later the city became a center of the Christian faith – following the visit of the Apostle Paul – as the remains of its basilicas testify.

Read More on: UNESCO: Every Person Must Visit these 18 Greek Monuments

Philip Chrysopoulos

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UNESCO: Every Person Must Visit these 18 Greek Monuments

UNESCO advises travellers to Greece to visit 18 monuments that are an absolute must as World Heritage Monuments.

UNESCO has branded a total 1,073 sites as World Heritage Monuments, and 18 of them are located in Greece:

The Acropolis: The Parthenon and the other buildings on the Athenian hill – known also as “the sacred rock” – are masterpieces of classical architecture. Completed in 5th Century BC, they are still influential in blending harmonic architecture with natural surroundings.

Aigai (modern-day Vergina): The first capital of the Kingdom of Macedon, home of Alexander the Great, and burial ground of his father, Philip II of Macedon. It is decorated with mosaics and stuccoes and has a burial ground with over 300 and remains that are fairly well-preserved.

Delphi: The sanctuary of Delphi, home of the oracle of Apollo, sits at the foot of Mount Parnassus. It was the spiritual center of the Greek world.

Mystras: The well-preserved medieval city of Mystras played a central role in the final years of the Byzantine Empire.

Olympia: The location of the ancient Olympic Games in Peloponnese beginning in 776 BC. In addition to numerous temples and sanctuaries, it contains the remains of its famous stadium.

Mycenae and Tiryns: The most important cities of Mycenean Greece, flourishing between the 15th and 12th centuries BC. The Lion’s Gate and Treasury of Atreus at Mycenae have been listed as “outstanding examples of human creative genius”.

Delos: The sacred island that was the birthplace of Apollo and Artemis, according to mythology. Other than a pan-Hellenic sanctuary, was also a prosperous trading port.

Monastery of Saint John: The island of Patmos is believed to be the place where Saint John the Theologian wrote his Gospel and the Apocalypse. The monastery was founded in the 10th century and has served as a place of pilgrimage.

Medieval City of Rhodes: Built by The Order of St John of Jerusalem, it is one of the most impressive urban complexes of the Gothic period.

Monasteries of Daphni, Hosios Loukas and Nea Moni of Chios: The three monasteries in three different locations share the same aesthetics. Lavishly decorated in the 11th and 12th centuries are all exquisite examples of the ‘second golden age of Byzantine art’.

Old Town of Corfu: Strategically positioned at the entrance of the Adriatic Sea, the Ionian island had three forts designed by renowned Venetian engineers to protect the maritime trading interests of the Republic of Venice.

Paleochristian and Byzantine monuments of Thessaloniki: Fine churches built from the 4th to the 15th century.

Pythagoreion and Heraion of Samos: Pythagoreion was an ancient fortified port, marked by several civilizations that inhabited the Aegean island since the 3rd millennium BC. Heraion was the temple of the Samian Hera.

Sanctuary of Asklepios at Epidaurus: The shrine of Asklepios, god of medicine, was built during the 6th century BC at the latest. The temple of Asklepios, the Tholos and the Theatre – considered one of the purest masterpieces of Greek architecture – dated from the 4th century.

Temple of Apollo Epicurius at Bassae: The temple to the god of healing and the sun was built towards the middle of the 5th century BC. It stands in the heights of the mountains of Arcadia.

Meteora: The inaccessible sandstone peaks, like ‘columns of the sky’, host monasteries from the 11th century onwards. Twenty-four of these monasteries were built, despite incredible difficulties, at the time of the great revival of the eremetic ideal in the 15th century.

Mount Athos: An Orthodox spiritual center since 1054, Mount Athos has enjoyed an autonomous statue since Byzantine times. There are about 20 monasteries inhabited by some 1,400 monks. The ‘Holy Mountain’, which is forbidden to women and children, is also a recognized artistic site that has influenced Orthodox art.

Philippi: The walled city in the present-day region of Eastern Macedonia was founded in 356 BC by the Macedonian King Philip II. Later the city became a center of the Christian faith – following the visit of the Apostle Paul – as the remains of its basilicas testify.

Read More on: UNESCO: Every Person Must Visit these 18 Greek Monuments

Philip Chrysopoulos

Search Results for “Greece Travel” – Greece.GreekReporter.com Latest News from Greece
Greek News, Politics, Sports, Entertainment & Economy


UNESCO: Every Person Must Visit these 18 Greek Monuments

UNESCO advises travellers to Greece to visit 18 monuments that are an absolute must as World Heritage Monuments.

UNESCO has branded a total 1,073 sites as World Heritage Monuments, and 18 of them are located in Greece:

The Acropolis: The Parthenon and the other buildings on the Athenian hill – known also as “the sacred rock” – are masterpieces of classical architecture. Completed in 5th Century BC, they are still influential in blending harmonic architecture with natural surroundings.

Aigai (modern-day Vergina): The first capital of the Kingdom of Macedon, home of Alexander the Great, and burial ground of his father, Philip II of Macedon. It is decorated with mosaics and stuccoes and has a burial ground with over 300 and remains that are fairly well-preserved.

Delphi: The sanctuary of Delphi, home of the oracle of Apollo, sits at the foot of Mount Parnassus. It was the spiritual center of the Greek world.

Mystras: The well-preserved medieval city of Mystras played a central role in the final years of the Byzantine Empire.

Olympia: The location of the ancient Olympic Games in Peloponnese beginning in 776 BC. In addition to numerous temples and sanctuaries, it contains the remains of its famous stadium.

Mycenae and Tiryns: The most important cities of Mycenean Greece, flourishing between the 15th and 12th centuries BC. The Lion’s Gate and Treasury of Atreus at Mycenae have been listed as “outstanding examples of human creative genius”.

Delos: The sacred island that was the birthplace of Apollo and Artemis, according to mythology. Other than a pan-Hellenic sanctuary, was also a prosperous trading port.

Monastery of Saint John: The island of Patmos is believed to be the place where Saint John the Theologian wrote his Gospel and the Apocalypse. The monastery was founded in the 10th century and has served as a place of pilgrimage.

Medieval City of Rhodes: Built by The Order of St John of Jerusalem, it is one of the most impressive urban complexes of the Gothic period.

Monasteries of Daphni, Hosios Loukas and Nea Moni of Chios: The three monasteries in three different locations share the same aesthetics. Lavishly decorated in the 11th and 12th centuries are all exquisite examples of the ‘second golden age of Byzantine art’.

Old Town of Corfu: Strategically positioned at the entrance of the Adriatic Sea, the Ionian island had three forts designed by renowned Venetian engineers to protect the maritime trading interests of the Republic of Venice.

Paleochristian and Byzantine monuments of Thessaloniki: Fine churches built from the 4th to the 15th century.

Pythagoreion and Heraion of Samos: Pythagoreion was an ancient fortified port, marked by several civilizations that inhabited the Aegean island since the 3rd millennium BC. Heraion was the temple of the Samian Hera.

Sanctuary of Asklepios at Epidaurus: The shrine of Asklepios, god of medicine, was built during the 6th century BC at the latest. The temple of Asklepios, the Tholos and the Theatre – considered one of the purest masterpieces of Greek architecture – dated from the 4th century.

Temple of Apollo Epicurius at Bassae: The temple to the god of healing and the sun was built towards the middle of the 5th century BC. It stands in the heights of the mountains of Arcadia.

Meteora: The inaccessible sandstone peaks, like ‘columns of the sky’, host monasteries from the 11th century onwards. Twenty-four of these monasteries were built, despite incredible difficulties, at the time of the great revival of the eremetic ideal in the 15th century.

Mount Athos: An Orthodox spiritual center since 1054, Mount Athos has enjoyed an autonomous statue since Byzantine times. There are about 20 monasteries inhabited by some 1,400 monks. The ‘Holy Mountain’, which is forbidden to women and children, is also a recognized artistic site that has influenced Orthodox art.

Philippi: The walled city in the present-day region of Eastern Macedonia was founded in 356 BC by the Macedonian King Philip II. Later the city became a center of the Christian faith – following the visit of the Apostle Paul – as the remains of its basilicas testify.

Read More on: UNESCO: Every Person Must Visit these 18 Greek Monuments

Philip Chrysopoulos

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Traveler Flies to Crete as Only Passenger on Plane

Author Karon Grieve flew from Glasgow to Heraklion, Crete on a jet all by herself; and she had only paid 46 British pounds for the flight, a Daily Record report says.

The Scottish writer and food expert did not expect that she would have a whole passenger jet all to herself when she boarded on Sunday afternoon.

As the only passenger, Grieve received the VIP treatment and all messages from the pilot were addressed to her alone.

“When I turned up for the flight, I expected it to be quiet because it’s the very end of season and most people are coming home,” Grieve told the Daily Record.

“I asked the girl at check-in how many were going to be flying and she said I should guess, so I counted it down from 10 and it turned out there were three people booked on,” she said.

“Imagine my surprise when I got to the gate and the flight crew greeted me saying, ‘Hi, you are our only passenger. You have your own private jet today’, Grieve said.

“I was amazed. The captain Laura came and chatted before take-off and I was in first name terms with Viktoria, Ashleigh, Toyah and Diane before the doors even closed,” she continued. “As we flew over places of interest, Laura would come on the tannoy saying, ‘Hi, Karon and the girls. We are now flying over Croatia, look to your left.”

The author rents an apartment in Crete where she writes a novel. She has already done 18 flights this year, according to the report.

Read More on: Traveler Flies to Crete as Only Passenger on Plane

Philip Chrysopoulos

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Vlogger’s Video “The DON’Ts of Visiting Greece” Goes Viral

Now here’s something both useful and funny for first-time visitors to Greece. University of Illinois professor and travel vlogger Mark Wolters posted a video about the “Don’ts of visiting Greece,” containing things a first time visitor should avoid, in order not to offend Greeks.

Full of cultural stereotypes, but quite informative and funny nevertheless, the video covers advice about things tourists and travelers should not do when they are in Greece.

From showing the palm of your hand to not expecting Greek Time there are things that tourists to Athens, Santorini and Crete should know before they come to Greece.

The video was filmed during the professor’s vacation in Crete this summer. Wolters, whose wife, Jocelyn, is Greek, has posted a series of “Don’ts” videos about several countries on his YouTube channel.

Read More on: Vlogger’s Video “The DON’Ts of Visiting Greece” Goes Viral

Theo Ioannou

Search Results for “Greece Travel” – Greece.GreekReporter.com Latest News from Greece
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Chinese Tourists and Investors in Greece Piling Up

Chinese tourists are currently “invading” Greece in big numbers. Last year, 150,000 Chinese travelers visited the country. Usually they travel in groups, but more and more individual travelers are also arriving to the country, where appreciation for its rich history is always high.

Most visitors from the Far East stay in Greece for one or two nights at most. Nevertheless, their importance for the local hotel industry and the whole Greek tourism is undeniable.

In a local hotel in Athens, Chinese visitors represent a quarter of all guests. This amount is on the rise, despite some minor issues with the guests. These issues are connected to meals mainly, as they prefer food from their own country.

Hoteliers are trying to adapt to their demands and are offering Chinese food. Many Chinese restaurants are opening in Athens, although admittedly, Chinese food in Europe is quite different from the original Far East cuisine.

The main target group from China are young visitors. “It’s easier for younger people to book flights and hotels, as they know how to do it online. So, it is convenient for them to pay a visit to Europe,” a Chinese tourist in Athens said.

Other than actually visiting the country, Chinese tourists are also greatly boosting the Greek property market. This was confirmed by Lan Xiao Cheng, representative of Silk Road Travel, a travel company for Chinese tourists.

Many Chinese people are willing to invest in Greece. They buy properties, renovate them and then rent them out. Reportedly more than a thousand families have invested necessary funds to obtain the so called Golden Visa. This visa is available to those, who invest at least 250,000 euros in Greece. This visa is in fact a five-year residence permit.

The Chinese are boosting the Greek economy. This, however, is perhaps only the beginning of a possible big tourist boom in the future. In September, direct flights from Beijing to Athens are expected to launch. Thus, if last year’s 150,000 visitors are any indication, 2017 is expected to be a record year for tourists from China.

Read More on: Chinese Tourists and Investors in Greece Piling Up

Theo Ioannou

Search Results for “Greece Travel” – Greece.GreekReporter.com Latest News from Greece
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The Profile of Greek Tourists Abroad; A PayPal Survey

According to the latest Travel Report prepared by PayPal and analytical agency GfK – Greek tourists appreciate attractive prices and unique natural and cultural heritage of the Central Eastern European (CEE) region.

In the last three years, the most popular Greeks’ destination in CEE was Bulgaria, visited by 44% of Greek respondents. According to the survey, Cyprus and Czech Republic were the second and the third the most often visited countries by our compatriots, 41% and 15% respectively.

The preferences regarding destinations go hand in hand with the type of holidays taken by tourists. The biggest groups of Greek travelers visiting Central and Eastern Europe in the last 3 years went for leisure (70%) and culture (30%). Other popular types of trips among Greek citizens were family and friends visit (chosen by 15%), business travel (14%) and shopping tours (13%). Only 9% travelled for events (festivals, concerts, performances etc.)

Most of Greeks prefer to visit Central and Eastern Europe in spring and spend there less than one week. For such trips, 35% of Greeks spend 250-500 euros and 34% spend 501-1,000 euros.


The most popular occasion for traveling to CEE are annual vacations, followed by national holidays and weekends.

Most of the expenditures for vacations in Central and Eastern Europe are covered by cash (62%), followed by credit cards (54%) and PayPal (14%). However, a role of online payments is significant – only 28% of Greek tourists say that they prefer to pay during planning trip offline

According to the same survey, Greeks seem to be proud of their country and its tourist value. Ninety-nine percent of them would recommend visiting Greece to foreign tourists while only 1% of respondents would not do this.

In Greeks’ opinion, the most attractive venues for foreign tourists in Greece are the Greek islands, indicated by 70% of respondents. Acropolis, Thessaloniki and Delphi pointed by 60%, 50% and 40% of Greeks, respectively.

Read More on: The Profile of Greek Tourists Abroad; A PayPal Survey

Tasos Kokkinidis

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Chinese Investors First in Taking Advantage of Greece’s Golden Visa Program

The Golden Visa program is one of the most inventive projects created by Greece’s Ministry of Economy to lure foreign investors in order to help the country’s economy recover from the slump.

The Golden Visa program is offering five-year residency rights to the investor and his immediate family in return for real estate acquisitions or for strategic investments exceeding 250,000 euros. The residency permit is also renewable if the investment remains in Greece. The residence permit does not foresee a right to employment and citizenship can only be granted after seven years of residency.

The program seems to be successful so far. According to ministry data citing real estate permits from the time the program went into effect until January 31, 2017, of the 1,573 licenses granted, 664 were to buyers from China, 348 from Russia, 77 from Egypt, 73 from Lebanon and 67 from Ukraine.

Of the total 3,809 residence permits granted to investors and family members, 1,580 were given to Chinese individuals, 787 to Russians, 211 to Iraqis, 203 to Lebanese and 179 to Egyptians.

Chinese Investments in Greece

The concession of Greece’s biggest port and one of the largest in Europe, the Piraeus Port Authority, to China’s Cosco has been the biggest Chinese investment in the Mediterranean country. The deal for 67% stake of the Piraeus port was signed in July 2016, with the Chinese shipping giant promising investments of 500 million euros to “turn Piraeus into the biggest transport center in the Mediterranean.”

Chinese group Fosun International has made its way into Greece since 2014, after signing an agreement with the Latsis Group to participate in the transformation of former Athens airport at Elliniko into the biggest real estate project in Europe.

Fosun is aiming at the tourist sector as well. One of the plans Fosun has is to use its membership in the Thomas Cook Group to begin building vacation packages specifically for the vast Chinese market. According to Fosun, Greece is a very safe travel destination for visitors.

Recently, Fosun has made a substantial bid for Greece’s biggest insurance company, Ethniki Asfalistiki (National Insurance). However, the Greek-American Calamos-EXIN consortium managed to acquire Greece’s emblematic insurance company.

Read More on: Chinese Investors First in Taking Advantage of Greece’s Golden Visa Program

Philip Chrysopoulos

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67 Students Aboard Bus That Caught Fire Near Patras Sent to Hotel in Rio

Sixty-seven students who were aboard a tourist bus that caught fire in the port city of Patras on Thursday evening found accommodation in a hotel in Rio.

Earlier reports said one person was rushed to hospital. The fire broke out at 6:30 p.m. while the bus was traveling along the Patras bypass near the exit to Ovrya. Fire brigade forces and ambulances were sent to the scene to put out the fire and offer assistance.

Source: ANA-MPA

Read More on: 67 Students Aboard Bus That Caught Fire Near Patras Sent to Hotel in Rio

Kerry Kolasa-Sikiaridi

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EasyJet Flight to Larnaca Forced to Land in Turkey Before Diverting to Athens

An Easyjet aircraft with 184 souls on board encountered difficult times in the air as well as on the ground on Friday evening. The plane traveling from Gatwick to Larnaca ran into bad weather and the crew was forced to make a landing at the airport of Dalaman in Turkey.

The plane managed “to first land for a few minutes” on the ground at Dalaman, and then it had to divert to Athens before completing the flight to Paphos, where passengers were transferred to Larnaca by bus, according to Cyprus Mail Online. The reason being for the fiasco is that Turkey does not recognize Cyprus and authorities would not give permission for the plane to fly directly from Dalaman, Turkey to Cyprus.

Also, Sigmalive said that passengers onboard claimed that the aircraft was not granted permission to land at the Turkish airport by the authorities because of “an issue was raised as to the religious and political beliefs of the passengers.”

Following the incident, former Foreign Minister Erato Kozakou Markoulli tweeted that the event should be reported to the United Nations, the European Organization for the Safety of Air Navigation (Eurocontrol) and the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO).

Read More on: EasyJet Flight to Larnaca Forced to Land in Turkey Before Diverting to Athens

Kerry Kolasa-Sikiaridi

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