Korinthos Mountain Area: Find the explorer inside you! (PHOTOS)

tk

Living or staying in Athens and dreaming of an escape to nature in the heart of the winter? Then take a break in the mountain area of Korinthos! Take the very comfortable motorway connecting Athens to Patras and in a matter of two hours you’ll see your dream come true!

Starting here

Stay in a place where you will be able to easily move around. We suggest Stympalia, Trikala, or the beautiful little town of Xylokastro, on the coast of Korinthos. The mountainous landscape, dotted with picturesque villages and beautified by two lakes, extends over the fir-clad slopes of Mt Ziria, the second biggest of Peloponnese to Taygetos. You’ll regret leaving the area without seeing and doing what we are hereby suggesting:

Stymphalia

st

This town has been built in the Killini (Cyllene at Ziria) mountain region and was renowned in mythology. According to the legend, Hercules slew the Stymphalian fowls, the man-eating birds with the bronze wings that lived in the swamps, on the lake’s banks of the same name. It is located 61 km W of the city of Korinthos.

Points of interest

Lake Stymphalia is situated at an altitude of 700 metres between four mountains: Ziria, Oligirto, Mavrovounio and Gavria. It is considered to be a rare wetland habitat and hosts more than 143 species of birds, some of which are rare. It is worth stopping by at one of the bird observatories along the lakeside road.
The ruins of the Ancient city of Stymphalos on the lake’s northern roadside where the remnants of the Ancient Agora’s public buildings, fortifications and temples have been discovered that bear testament to the past’s glory. The city which has been excavated was founded in approximately 350 B.C. on the site of a town with inter-dispersed ruins dating to the early and late Bronze Age period. The partial destruction of Stymphalos appears to be due to a Roman military attack after 146 B.C.

ko1

The Environmental Museum of Stymphalia.
The impressive Zaraka Cistercian Monastery ruins, a little outside the village, appear to be the first noteworthy evidence for the monastery, which date back to 1236. Its church (a three-aisled basilica roofed with groin vaults) has been excavated over three periods (1928, 1962, 1993-1997), while the columns are reminiscent of 13th century Gothic churches.
The villages Kaliani (5 km E), Lafka (10 km SW) where a prominent museum operates with old tools, and Kastania (14 km W) are set in a magnificent landscape with chestnut, fir and plane trees. Take in the beauty of the area by mountaineering as some spots offer a breathtaking view to the lake.

Trikala

This market town has been built among the pine and fir tree forested slopes of Mount Cyllene (Ziria) and is one of the prefecture’s most popular mountain resorts. The three districts (Kato, Messea and Ano Trikala) are the ideal base for alternative tourism activities in the surrounding region. It is located 67 km W of the city of Korinthos.

tk

Points of interest

The churches of Agios Dimitrios (1697) and Agios Ioannis (1853) with the interesting murals (Kato Trikala), Metamorphosis tou Sotira (Mesaia Trikala, 9th century) and Agios Nikolaos with the notable 10th century murals (Ano Trikala).
The ruins of the Notaras family mansion and the house where Saint Gerasimos was born at Ano Trikala.
The Agios Vlasios monastery (17th century) is set in an evergreen environment.
The rural chapel of Koimissi tis Theotokou (16th century) with the significant hagiographies and Byzantine icons.
Flambouritsa valley, situated between the Megali and Mikri Ziria clusters, which together with the highest mountain peaks have been included in the “Natura 2000” European Union network.
The cave of Hermes on the western side of Flambouritsa with the prominent stalagmite and stalactite decoration.
Lake Kefalogianni on the eastern side and the Lake Dassiou on the western side of Ziria.

Feneos

The highland town has been built in a verdant setting close to the archaeological site. It has a marvellous square and stone built houses. It is 100 km to the west of the city of Korinthos.

ko2

Points of interest

Ancient Feneos with the ruins of the Ancient city where you will see the relics of the temple of Asclepius and a section of the acropolis’ fortifications. The Archaeological Collection with findings from excavations in the region is on display at Kalivia (Ancient Feneos).
The artificial lake Doxa has been formed by the Feneos-Doxa dam in the waters of the Olvios River. The region’s landscape is enchanting and it’s worth walking along the perimeter course. The (14th century) Paliomonastiro is located at the lake’s centre (linked to the shore by a narrow strip of land).
The three-storey monastery of Agios Georgios (1693), very close to Lake Doxa, provides an impressive view of the region. During the Turkish Occupation, the monastery also operated as a “secret school” (the site has now been converted to a small museum). When there, don’t forget to have some of the tasteful spoon sweets from rose petals made by the monks themselves.
The magnificent Feneos valley where potatoes, beans, lentils and walnuts of an exceptional quality are cultivated, which can be purchased from the region’s stores.
The picturesque Ziria highland towns of Ano Tarsos (close to “Panagia Vrahou”, a small fortress city dating to the 14th-15th century), Kato Tarsos, Steno, Goura, Mesino and Mosia.

ko3

Activities

Skiing, sleighs, snow mobiles at the Ziria Sports (Ski) Centre
Mountaineering
Canyoning
Hiking along the organised and marked Ziria paths (total length of 55 km). The courses in the Lake Dasiou region and more specifically down to Karia village are will excite you
Horse riding at the “Freestyle Horse Riding Centre” (at Rethi 4 km north of Kato Trikala)
4Χ4 Itineraries with the most interesting itinerary terminating at Goura village, crossing through Skafidia plateau (course length of 15 km), via the Mavros Longos fir tree forest
Caving
Paragliding
Off-road trips with motorcycles
Mountain bike riding from the Ziria Sports Centre to Lake Dasiou for a total length of 4.5 km

Source: visitgreece.gr

Read More on: Korinthos Mountain Area: Find the explorer inside you! (PHOTOS)

Thema Newsroom

protothemanews.com » Search Results » Greece Tourism
Protothema.gr news in english


Korinthos Mountain Area: Find the explorer inside you! (PHOTOS)

tk

Living or staying in Athens and dreaming of an escape to nature in the heart of the winter? Then take a break in the mountain area of Korinthos! Take the very comfortable motorway connecting Athens to Patras and in a matter of two hours you’ll see your dream come true!

Starting here

Stay in a place where you will be able to easily move around. We suggest Stympalia, Trikala, or the beautiful little town of Xylokastro, on the coast of Korinthos. The mountainous landscape, dotted with picturesque villages and beautified by two lakes, extends over the fir-clad slopes of Mt Ziria, the second biggest of Peloponnese to Taygetos. You’ll regret leaving the area without seeing and doing what we are hereby suggesting:

Stymphalia

st

This town has been built in the Killini (Cyllene at Ziria) mountain region and was renowned in mythology. According to the legend, Hercules slew the Stymphalian fowls, the man-eating birds with the bronze wings that lived in the swamps, on the lake’s banks of the same name. It is located 61 km W of the city of Korinthos.

Points of interest

Lake Stymphalia is situated at an altitude of 700 metres between four mountains: Ziria, Oligirto, Mavrovounio and Gavria. It is considered to be a rare wetland habitat and hosts more than 143 species of birds, some of which are rare. It is worth stopping by at one of the bird observatories along the lakeside road.
The ruins of the Ancient city of Stymphalos on the lake’s northern roadside where the remnants of the Ancient Agora’s public buildings, fortifications and temples have been discovered that bear testament to the past’s glory. The city which has been excavated was founded in approximately 350 B.C. on the site of a town with inter-dispersed ruins dating to the early and late Bronze Age period. The partial destruction of Stymphalos appears to be due to a Roman military attack after 146 B.C.

ko1

The Environmental Museum of Stymphalia.
The impressive Zaraka Cistercian Monastery ruins, a little outside the village, appear to be the first noteworthy evidence for the monastery, which date back to 1236. Its church (a three-aisled basilica roofed with groin vaults) has been excavated over three periods (1928, 1962, 1993-1997), while the columns are reminiscent of 13th century Gothic churches.
The villages Kaliani (5 km E), Lafka (10 km SW) where a prominent museum operates with old tools, and Kastania (14 km W) are set in a magnificent landscape with chestnut, fir and plane trees. Take in the beauty of the area by mountaineering as some spots offer a breathtaking view to the lake.

Trikala

This market town has been built among the pine and fir tree forested slopes of Mount Cyllene (Ziria) and is one of the prefecture’s most popular mountain resorts. The three districts (Kato, Messea and Ano Trikala) are the ideal base for alternative tourism activities in the surrounding region. It is located 67 km W of the city of Korinthos.

tk

Points of interest

The churches of Agios Dimitrios (1697) and Agios Ioannis (1853) with the interesting murals (Kato Trikala), Metamorphosis tou Sotira (Mesaia Trikala, 9th century) and Agios Nikolaos with the notable 10th century murals (Ano Trikala).
The ruins of the Notaras family mansion and the house where Saint Gerasimos was born at Ano Trikala.
The Agios Vlasios monastery (17th century) is set in an evergreen environment.
The rural chapel of Koimissi tis Theotokou (16th century) with the significant hagiographies and Byzantine icons.
Flambouritsa valley, situated between the Megali and Mikri Ziria clusters, which together with the highest mountain peaks have been included in the “Natura 2000” European Union network.
The cave of Hermes on the western side of Flambouritsa with the prominent stalagmite and stalactite decoration.
Lake Kefalogianni on the eastern side and the Lake Dassiou on the western side of Ziria.

Feneos

The highland town has been built in a verdant setting close to the archaeological site. It has a marvellous square and stone built houses. It is 100 km to the west of the city of Korinthos.

ko2

Points of interest

Ancient Feneos with the ruins of the Ancient city where you will see the relics of the temple of Asclepius and a section of the acropolis’ fortifications. The Archaeological Collection with findings from excavations in the region is on display at Kalivia (Ancient Feneos).
The artificial lake Doxa has been formed by the Feneos-Doxa dam in the waters of the Olvios River. The region’s landscape is enchanting and it’s worth walking along the perimeter course. The (14th century) Paliomonastiro is located at the lake’s centre (linked to the shore by a narrow strip of land).
The three-storey monastery of Agios Georgios (1693), very close to Lake Doxa, provides an impressive view of the region. During the Turkish Occupation, the monastery also operated as a “secret school” (the site has now been converted to a small museum). When there, don’t forget to have some of the tasteful spoon sweets from rose petals made by the monks themselves.
The magnificent Feneos valley where potatoes, beans, lentils and walnuts of an exceptional quality are cultivated, which can be purchased from the region’s stores.
The picturesque Ziria highland towns of Ano Tarsos (close to “Panagia Vrahou”, a small fortress city dating to the 14th-15th century), Kato Tarsos, Steno, Goura, Mesino and Mosia.

ko3

Activities

Skiing, sleighs, snow mobiles at the Ziria Sports (Ski) Centre
Mountaineering
Canyoning
Hiking along the organised and marked Ziria paths (total length of 55 km). The courses in the Lake Dasiou region and more specifically down to Karia village are will excite you
Horse riding at the “Freestyle Horse Riding Centre” (at Rethi 4 km north of Kato Trikala)
4Χ4 Itineraries with the most interesting itinerary terminating at Goura village, crossing through Skafidia plateau (course length of 15 km), via the Mavros Longos fir tree forest
Caving
Paragliding
Off-road trips with motorcycles
Mountain bike riding from the Ziria Sports Centre to Lake Dasiou for a total length of 4.5 km

Source: visitgreece.gr

Read More on: Korinthos Mountain Area: Find the explorer inside you! (PHOTOS)

Thema Newsroom

protothemanews.com » Search Results » Greece Tourism
Protothema.gr news in english


Korinthos Mountain Area: Find the explorer inside you! (PHOTOS)

tk

Living or staying in Athens and dreaming of an escape to nature in the heart of the winter? Then take a break in the mountain area of Korinthos! Take the very comfortable motorway connecting Athens to Patras and in a matter of two hours you’ll see your dream come true!

Starting here

Stay in a place where you will be able to easily move around. We suggest Stympalia, Trikala, or the beautiful little town of Xylokastro, on the coast of Korinthos. The mountainous landscape, dotted with picturesque villages and beautified by two lakes, extends over the fir-clad slopes of Mt Ziria, the second biggest of Peloponnese to Taygetos. You’ll regret leaving the area without seeing and doing what we are hereby suggesting:

Stymphalia

st

This town has been built in the Killini (Cyllene at Ziria) mountain region and was renowned in mythology. According to the legend, Hercules slew the Stymphalian fowls, the man-eating birds with the bronze wings that lived in the swamps, on the lake’s banks of the same name. It is located 61 km W of the city of Korinthos.

Points of interest

Lake Stymphalia is situated at an altitude of 700 metres between four mountains: Ziria, Oligirto, Mavrovounio and Gavria. It is considered to be a rare wetland habitat and hosts more than 143 species of birds, some of which are rare. It is worth stopping by at one of the bird observatories along the lakeside road.
The ruins of the Ancient city of Stymphalos on the lake’s northern roadside where the remnants of the Ancient Agora’s public buildings, fortifications and temples have been discovered that bear testament to the past’s glory. The city which has been excavated was founded in approximately 350 B.C. on the site of a town with inter-dispersed ruins dating to the early and late Bronze Age period. The partial destruction of Stymphalos appears to be due to a Roman military attack after 146 B.C.

ko1

The Environmental Museum of Stymphalia.
The impressive Zaraka Cistercian Monastery ruins, a little outside the village, appear to be the first noteworthy evidence for the monastery, which date back to 1236. Its church (a three-aisled basilica roofed with groin vaults) has been excavated over three periods (1928, 1962, 1993-1997), while the columns are reminiscent of 13th century Gothic churches.
The villages Kaliani (5 km E), Lafka (10 km SW) where a prominent museum operates with old tools, and Kastania (14 km W) are set in a magnificent landscape with chestnut, fir and plane trees. Take in the beauty of the area by mountaineering as some spots offer a breathtaking view to the lake.

Trikala

This market town has been built among the pine and fir tree forested slopes of Mount Cyllene (Ziria) and is one of the prefecture’s most popular mountain resorts. The three districts (Kato, Messea and Ano Trikala) are the ideal base for alternative tourism activities in the surrounding region. It is located 67 km W of the city of Korinthos.

tk

Points of interest

The churches of Agios Dimitrios (1697) and Agios Ioannis (1853) with the interesting murals (Kato Trikala), Metamorphosis tou Sotira (Mesaia Trikala, 9th century) and Agios Nikolaos with the notable 10th century murals (Ano Trikala).
The ruins of the Notaras family mansion and the house where Saint Gerasimos was born at Ano Trikala.
The Agios Vlasios monastery (17th century) is set in an evergreen environment.
The rural chapel of Koimissi tis Theotokou (16th century) with the significant hagiographies and Byzantine icons.
Flambouritsa valley, situated between the Megali and Mikri Ziria clusters, which together with the highest mountain peaks have been included in the “Natura 2000” European Union network.
The cave of Hermes on the western side of Flambouritsa with the prominent stalagmite and stalactite decoration.
Lake Kefalogianni on the eastern side and the Lake Dassiou on the western side of Ziria.

Feneos

The highland town has been built in a verdant setting close to the archaeological site. It has a marvellous square and stone built houses. It is 100 km to the west of the city of Korinthos.

ko2

Points of interest

Ancient Feneos with the ruins of the Ancient city where you will see the relics of the temple of Asclepius and a section of the acropolis’ fortifications. The Archaeological Collection with findings from excavations in the region is on display at Kalivia (Ancient Feneos).
The artificial lake Doxa has been formed by the Feneos-Doxa dam in the waters of the Olvios River. The region’s landscape is enchanting and it’s worth walking along the perimeter course. The (14th century) Paliomonastiro is located at the lake’s centre (linked to the shore by a narrow strip of land).
The three-storey monastery of Agios Georgios (1693), very close to Lake Doxa, provides an impressive view of the region. During the Turkish Occupation, the monastery also operated as a “secret school” (the site has now been converted to a small museum). When there, don’t forget to have some of the tasteful spoon sweets from rose petals made by the monks themselves.
The magnificent Feneos valley where potatoes, beans, lentils and walnuts of an exceptional quality are cultivated, which can be purchased from the region’s stores.
The picturesque Ziria highland towns of Ano Tarsos (close to “Panagia Vrahou”, a small fortress city dating to the 14th-15th century), Kato Tarsos, Steno, Goura, Mesino and Mosia.

ko3

Activities

Skiing, sleighs, snow mobiles at the Ziria Sports (Ski) Centre
Mountaineering
Canyoning
Hiking along the organised and marked Ziria paths (total length of 55 km). The courses in the Lake Dasiou region and more specifically down to Karia village are will excite you
Horse riding at the “Freestyle Horse Riding Centre” (at Rethi 4 km north of Kato Trikala)
4Χ4 Itineraries with the most interesting itinerary terminating at Goura village, crossing through Skafidia plateau (course length of 15 km), via the Mavros Longos fir tree forest
Caving
Paragliding
Off-road trips with motorcycles
Mountain bike riding from the Ziria Sports Centre to Lake Dasiou for a total length of 4.5 km

Source: visitgreece.gr

Read More on: Korinthos Mountain Area: Find the explorer inside you! (PHOTOS)

Thema Newsroom

protothemanews.com » Search Results » Greece Tourism
Protothema.gr news in english


UNESCO: Every Person Must Visit these 18 Greek Monuments

UNESCO advises travellers to Greece to visit 18 monuments that are an absolute must as World Heritage Monuments.

UNESCO has branded a total 1,073 sites as World Heritage Monuments, and 18 of them are located in Greece:

The Acropolis: The Parthenon and the other buildings on the Athenian hill – known also as “the sacred rock” – are masterpieces of classical architecture. Completed in 5th Century BC, they are still influential in blending harmonic architecture with natural surroundings.

Aigai (modern-day Vergina): The first capital of the Kingdom of Macedon, home of Alexander the Great, and burial ground of his father, Philip II of Macedon. It is decorated with mosaics and stuccoes and has a burial ground with over 300 and remains that are fairly well-preserved.

Delphi: The sanctuary of Delphi, home of the oracle of Apollo, sits at the foot of Mount Parnassus. It was the spiritual center of the Greek world.

Mystras: The well-preserved medieval city of Mystras played a central role in the final years of the Byzantine Empire.

Olympia: The location of the ancient Olympic Games in Peloponnese beginning in 776 BC. In addition to numerous temples and sanctuaries, it contains the remains of its famous stadium.

Mycenae and Tiryns: The most important cities of Mycenean Greece, flourishing between the 15th and 12th centuries BC. The Lion’s Gate and Treasury of Atreus at Mycenae have been listed as “outstanding examples of human creative genius”.

Delos: The sacred island that was the birthplace of Apollo and Artemis, according to mythology. Other than a pan-Hellenic sanctuary, was also a prosperous trading port.

Monastery of Saint John: The island of Patmos is believed to be the place where Saint John the Theologian wrote his Gospel and the Apocalypse. The monastery was founded in the 10th century and has served as a place of pilgrimage.

Medieval City of Rhodes: Built by The Order of St John of Jerusalem, it is one of the most impressive urban complexes of the Gothic period.

Monasteries of Daphni, Hosios Loukas and Nea Moni of Chios: The three monasteries in three different locations share the same aesthetics. Lavishly decorated in the 11th and 12th centuries are all exquisite examples of the ‘second golden age of Byzantine art’.

Old Town of Corfu: Strategically positioned at the entrance of the Adriatic Sea, the Ionian island had three forts designed by renowned Venetian engineers to protect the maritime trading interests of the Republic of Venice.

Paleochristian and Byzantine monuments of Thessaloniki: Fine churches built from the 4th to the 15th century.

Pythagoreion and Heraion of Samos: Pythagoreion was an ancient fortified port, marked by several civilizations that inhabited the Aegean island since the 3rd millennium BC. Heraion was the temple of the Samian Hera.

Sanctuary of Asklepios at Epidaurus: The shrine of Asklepios, god of medicine, was built during the 6th century BC at the latest. The temple of Asklepios, the Tholos and the Theatre – considered one of the purest masterpieces of Greek architecture – dated from the 4th century.

Temple of Apollo Epicurius at Bassae: The temple to the god of healing and the sun was built towards the middle of the 5th century BC. It stands in the heights of the mountains of Arcadia.

Meteora: The inaccessible sandstone peaks, like ‘columns of the sky’, host monasteries from the 11th century onwards. Twenty-four of these monasteries were built, despite incredible difficulties, at the time of the great revival of the eremetic ideal in the 15th century.

Mount Athos: An Orthodox spiritual center since 1054, Mount Athos has enjoyed an autonomous statue since Byzantine times. There are about 20 monasteries inhabited by some 1,400 monks. The ‘Holy Mountain’, which is forbidden to women and children, is also a recognized artistic site that has influenced Orthodox art.

Philippi: The walled city in the present-day region of Eastern Macedonia was founded in 356 BC by the Macedonian King Philip II. Later the city became a center of the Christian faith – following the visit of the Apostle Paul – as the remains of its basilicas testify.

Read More on: UNESCO: Every Person Must Visit these 18 Greek Monuments

Philip Chrysopoulos

Search Results for “Greece Travel” – Greece.GreekReporter.com Latest News from Greece
Greek News, Politics, Sports, Entertainment & Economy


UNESCO: Every Person Must Visit these 18 Greek Monuments

UNESCO advises travellers to Greece to visit 18 monuments that are an absolute must as World Heritage Monuments.

UNESCO has branded a total 1,073 sites as World Heritage Monuments, and 18 of them are located in Greece:

The Acropolis: The Parthenon and the other buildings on the Athenian hill – known also as “the sacred rock” – are masterpieces of classical architecture. Completed in 5th Century BC, they are still influential in blending harmonic architecture with natural surroundings.

Aigai (modern-day Vergina): The first capital of the Kingdom of Macedon, home of Alexander the Great, and burial ground of his father, Philip II of Macedon. It is decorated with mosaics and stuccoes and has a burial ground with over 300 and remains that are fairly well-preserved.

Delphi: The sanctuary of Delphi, home of the oracle of Apollo, sits at the foot of Mount Parnassus. It was the spiritual center of the Greek world.

Mystras: The well-preserved medieval city of Mystras played a central role in the final years of the Byzantine Empire.

Olympia: The location of the ancient Olympic Games in Peloponnese beginning in 776 BC. In addition to numerous temples and sanctuaries, it contains the remains of its famous stadium.

Mycenae and Tiryns: The most important cities of Mycenean Greece, flourishing between the 15th and 12th centuries BC. The Lion’s Gate and Treasury of Atreus at Mycenae have been listed as “outstanding examples of human creative genius”.

Delos: The sacred island that was the birthplace of Apollo and Artemis, according to mythology. Other than a pan-Hellenic sanctuary, was also a prosperous trading port.

Monastery of Saint John: The island of Patmos is believed to be the place where Saint John the Theologian wrote his Gospel and the Apocalypse. The monastery was founded in the 10th century and has served as a place of pilgrimage.

Medieval City of Rhodes: Built by The Order of St John of Jerusalem, it is one of the most impressive urban complexes of the Gothic period.

Monasteries of Daphni, Hosios Loukas and Nea Moni of Chios: The three monasteries in three different locations share the same aesthetics. Lavishly decorated in the 11th and 12th centuries are all exquisite examples of the ‘second golden age of Byzantine art’.

Old Town of Corfu: Strategically positioned at the entrance of the Adriatic Sea, the Ionian island had three forts designed by renowned Venetian engineers to protect the maritime trading interests of the Republic of Venice.

Paleochristian and Byzantine monuments of Thessaloniki: Fine churches built from the 4th to the 15th century.

Pythagoreion and Heraion of Samos: Pythagoreion was an ancient fortified port, marked by several civilizations that inhabited the Aegean island since the 3rd millennium BC. Heraion was the temple of the Samian Hera.

Sanctuary of Asklepios at Epidaurus: The shrine of Asklepios, god of medicine, was built during the 6th century BC at the latest. The temple of Asklepios, the Tholos and the Theatre – considered one of the purest masterpieces of Greek architecture – dated from the 4th century.

Temple of Apollo Epicurius at Bassae: The temple to the god of healing and the sun was built towards the middle of the 5th century BC. It stands in the heights of the mountains of Arcadia.

Meteora: The inaccessible sandstone peaks, like ‘columns of the sky’, host monasteries from the 11th century onwards. Twenty-four of these monasteries were built, despite incredible difficulties, at the time of the great revival of the eremetic ideal in the 15th century.

Mount Athos: An Orthodox spiritual center since 1054, Mount Athos has enjoyed an autonomous statue since Byzantine times. There are about 20 monasteries inhabited by some 1,400 monks. The ‘Holy Mountain’, which is forbidden to women and children, is also a recognized artistic site that has influenced Orthodox art.

Philippi: The walled city in the present-day region of Eastern Macedonia was founded in 356 BC by the Macedonian King Philip II. Later the city became a center of the Christian faith – following the visit of the Apostle Paul – as the remains of its basilicas testify.

Read More on: UNESCO: Every Person Must Visit these 18 Greek Monuments

Philip Chrysopoulos

Search Results for “Greece Travel” – Greece.GreekReporter.com Latest News from Greece
Greek News, Politics, Sports, Entertainment & Economy


UNESCO: Every Person Must Visit these 18 Greek Monuments

UNESCO advises travellers to Greece to visit 18 monuments that are an absolute must as World Heritage Monuments.

UNESCO has branded a total 1,073 sites as World Heritage Monuments, and 18 of them are located in Greece:

The Acropolis: The Parthenon and the other buildings on the Athenian hill – known also as “the sacred rock” – are masterpieces of classical architecture. Completed in 5th Century BC, they are still influential in blending harmonic architecture with natural surroundings.

Aigai (modern-day Vergina): The first capital of the Kingdom of Macedon, home of Alexander the Great, and burial ground of his father, Philip II of Macedon. It is decorated with mosaics and stuccoes and has a burial ground with over 300 and remains that are fairly well-preserved.

Delphi: The sanctuary of Delphi, home of the oracle of Apollo, sits at the foot of Mount Parnassus. It was the spiritual center of the Greek world.

Mystras: The well-preserved medieval city of Mystras played a central role in the final years of the Byzantine Empire.

Olympia: The location of the ancient Olympic Games in Peloponnese beginning in 776 BC. In addition to numerous temples and sanctuaries, it contains the remains of its famous stadium.

Mycenae and Tiryns: The most important cities of Mycenean Greece, flourishing between the 15th and 12th centuries BC. The Lion’s Gate and Treasury of Atreus at Mycenae have been listed as “outstanding examples of human creative genius”.

Delos: The sacred island that was the birthplace of Apollo and Artemis, according to mythology. Other than a pan-Hellenic sanctuary, was also a prosperous trading port.

Monastery of Saint John: The island of Patmos is believed to be the place where Saint John the Theologian wrote his Gospel and the Apocalypse. The monastery was founded in the 10th century and has served as a place of pilgrimage.

Medieval City of Rhodes: Built by The Order of St John of Jerusalem, it is one of the most impressive urban complexes of the Gothic period.

Monasteries of Daphni, Hosios Loukas and Nea Moni of Chios: The three monasteries in three different locations share the same aesthetics. Lavishly decorated in the 11th and 12th centuries are all exquisite examples of the ‘second golden age of Byzantine art’.

Old Town of Corfu: Strategically positioned at the entrance of the Adriatic Sea, the Ionian island had three forts designed by renowned Venetian engineers to protect the maritime trading interests of the Republic of Venice.

Paleochristian and Byzantine monuments of Thessaloniki: Fine churches built from the 4th to the 15th century.

Pythagoreion and Heraion of Samos: Pythagoreion was an ancient fortified port, marked by several civilizations that inhabited the Aegean island since the 3rd millennium BC. Heraion was the temple of the Samian Hera.

Sanctuary of Asklepios at Epidaurus: The shrine of Asklepios, god of medicine, was built during the 6th century BC at the latest. The temple of Asklepios, the Tholos and the Theatre – considered one of the purest masterpieces of Greek architecture – dated from the 4th century.

Temple of Apollo Epicurius at Bassae: The temple to the god of healing and the sun was built towards the middle of the 5th century BC. It stands in the heights of the mountains of Arcadia.

Meteora: The inaccessible sandstone peaks, like ‘columns of the sky’, host monasteries from the 11th century onwards. Twenty-four of these monasteries were built, despite incredible difficulties, at the time of the great revival of the eremetic ideal in the 15th century.

Mount Athos: An Orthodox spiritual center since 1054, Mount Athos has enjoyed an autonomous statue since Byzantine times. There are about 20 monasteries inhabited by some 1,400 monks. The ‘Holy Mountain’, which is forbidden to women and children, is also a recognized artistic site that has influenced Orthodox art.

Philippi: The walled city in the present-day region of Eastern Macedonia was founded in 356 BC by the Macedonian King Philip II. Later the city became a center of the Christian faith – following the visit of the Apostle Paul – as the remains of its basilicas testify.

Read More on: UNESCO: Every Person Must Visit these 18 Greek Monuments

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2nd International Conference on “Religious and Cultural Pluralism and Peaceful Coexistence in the Middle East

Athens.- GreekNewsOnline, ANA-MPA

Greek President Prokopis Pavlopoulos declared the opening of the 2nd International Conference of Athens on “Religious and Cultural Pluralism and Peaceful Coexistence in the Middle East” at the Intercontinental Hotel in Athens on Monday.

In his address, Pavlopoulos stressed the urgent need to sincerely seek the terms and conditions for the continuous support of dialogue between different civilisations, in the context of full respect for cultural and religious pluralism.

According to Greece’s president, conflict and war were a form of logical inconsistency for true civilisation, in which humanism and peace served as “archetypal traits”.

In this context, he argued that “the global turmoil and its risks are not rooted in the clash of civilisations, but in the fact that these civilisations are fading. And precisely because of this fading course they were no longer able to fulfill the natural peace-making mission that their essence determines through their co-existence and co-operation on a global scale.”

The Greek president noted that the conference was extremely timely as eveyone is worried over developments in the Middle East amid an increase of refugee flows, creating conditions of humanitarian crisis, contrary to any sense of civilization and justice.

FM Kotzias

Greece has assumed an important role as the country with the strongest historical and cultural ties within the surrounding region and as a beacon of security and stability, Foreign Minister Nikos Kotzias, addressing the Conference of Athens.

“The five tripartite initiatives of our country in the region, together with Cyprus, the ‘spirit of Rhodes’ for new security structures, the global initiative for living ancient civilisations and this initiative, as well as the cooperation of the Euromed Seven, constitute the cornerstones of our policy in the region,” he said and added: “Greece has been and is the country that has for thousands of years supported respect for that which is different, tolerance between religions and civilisations, the creative exchange of their achievements, and learning from one another.”

Criticising the large organisations operating in the region, with emphasis on the UN, which does not yet have a comprehensive plan, and the EU, which operates selectively towards states, individuals and minorities rather than the whole region, and in particular religious and cultural communities, the foreign minister made two important proposals: “To table a special resolution in 2018 in the UN and the Human Rights Committee and to include in EU documents the issues that we will be dealing with tomorrow.”

At the same time, he proposed the further strengthening of the European Observatory, the center for religious pluralism in the Middle East, which was established in the framework of the First International Conference.

The foreign minister underlined that “extremists have committed crimes against people, against religious communities, against our common cultural heritage and have violated values and rights, destroyed historic memories and monuments,” adding that “in our region we must fight for respect toward what is different, especially between Jews and Muslims, Christians and Yazidi, but also between Sunni and Shia Muslims, Kurds and Arabs.”

ALEXIS TSIPRAS

Greece supports strongly efforts to tackle religious extremism and terrorism, Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras said.

“We support with all our powers tackling religious extremism and terrorism. We support promoting peace, stability and security,” he said.

“We are struggling to make this an issue for the whole international community which is why, through our active role and action in all international fora, we encourage taking drastic diplomatic and economic initiatives in this direction,” he added.

Tsipras aid Greece cannot remain silent or absent in the presence of challenges affecting the wider region which are increasingly affecting Europe and its core, adding that the country is exercising an energetic, multi-dimensional foreign policy which allows it to utilize its geopolitical position, promote peace and stability and open channels of communication.

“Greece insists on the values of humanism, solidarity and tolerance even in the most difficult times as we proved during the refugee crisis, when Greece shouldered the weight of humanity,” he said.

The conference, which is an initiative of the foreign ministry, is “proof of the important role played by Greece in the wider region, highlighting once again our country’s long-standing culture of dialogue, solidarity and active participation in solving global and regional crises.”

Tsipras said Greece is the only country of the EU and NATO which is also located in southeastern Europe and experienced the consequences of conflicts through the refugee crisis.

“We know, therefore, very well how important it is to maintain the religious and cultural pluralism in the Middle East for the future of Europe. And the other way round: How important it is for Europe to contribute to peace and stability in the Middle East with determination, but also on the basis of international law and democratic and humanitarian values,” he added.

Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew

Interfaith cooperation can provide the ground to build peace and normalcy in the East Mediterranean and the Middle East, Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew told the second international conference in Athens.

In the first day of the two-day conference, the ecumenical patriarch warned that even if peace is achieved in the region, “the remaining problems will require time and a lot of hard work, as well as joint responsibility, synergy, and collaboration.” The wars in Middle East have “created large-scale destruction in the human, natural, cultural and religious environments,” and interfaith collaboration is vital to handle the continuing religious crisis and heal peoples’ emotional traumas, he said.

“Wherever people turn away from or interrupt dialogue,” he said, “what takes over is rigid ideologies, totalitarian regimes, brutal demagoguery, and finally weapons – destruction and death.” The ecumenical patriarch said the alternative was sincere dialogue in a loving spirit. “Sincere dialogue has the power to change the flow of history,” Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew said.

Ambassador Geoffrey Pyatt

In regions where religious freedom is not protected, instability, human rights abuses, and violent extremism are more likely to take root, U.S. Ambassador to Greece Geoffrey Pyatt said on Monday in remarks at the 2nd International Conference on “Religious and Cultural Pluralism and Peaceful Coexistence in the Middle East”, held in Athens.

“As President [Donald] Trump has highlighted, ‘From the beginning, America has been a place that has cherished the freedom of worship…Our goal is to achieve a better tomorrow-one where good people of all faiths, Christians and Muslims and Jewish and Hindu, can follow their hearts and worship according to their conscience,” he said.

Pyatt quoted comments made by State Secretary Rex Tillerson on the presentation of the 2016 International Religious Freedom Annual Report to note US commitment in continuing the country’s work with regional partners to protect religious minority communities from terrorist attacks and to preserve their cultural heritage.

“Where religious freedom is not protected, he added, we know that instability, human rights abuses, and violent extremism have a greater opportunity to take root,” the ambassador said.

He concluded by presenting a short video message from the US Special Advisor for Religious Minorities in the Near East and South/Central Asia, Knox Thames.

FM IOANNIS KASOULIDES

Cyprus Foreign Minister Ioannis Kasoulides underlined the need to actively protect social and religious diversity in states, speaking at the 2nd International Conference on “Religious and Cultural Pluralism and Peaceful Coexistence in the Middle East” on Monday in Athens.

He supported the establishment of a fund under international management to help the efforts of societies to not only build their homes from scratch but also their local infrastructure and economies.

He invited the participants to sign the Nicosia Treaty «in order to fight those who vandalise our cultural heritage in order to finance their criminal and terrorist organisations”.

Kasoulides congratulated his Greek counterpart Nikos Kotzias for organising the conference, noting that it was one of the Greek foreign ministry’s many initiatives for promoting dialogue and a positive agenda of cooperation in the wider region. He said that the Athens conference, together with the Conference of Rhodes, have created a web of dialogue and collaboration with tangible results within the region.

Finally, Kasoulides referred to the systematic destruction of cultural heritage in Syria and Iraq by Daesh terrorists and underlined that “if we tackle the illegal market in cultural and archaeological treasures, we will strike a blow against those who are profiting from them.”

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