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Weekly deals offer big discounts on exotic cruises – ABC15.com (KNXV

Itching for an exotic getaway? This week’s top deals will get you on the high seas at a low price!

For travelers looking to make their way around Europe, Travelzoo is offering $300 off regular rates on a 10-night Mediterranean cruise .

Take in a sweeping ocean view as you make your way from Istanbul stopping in Israel, Turkey and Greece for just $499. Adventurous passengers can even take in the ship’s solarium with a retractable glass roof and a 200-foot rock-climbing wall.

Want a slice of Hawaiian paradise instead?

Save big and go island hopping with a seven-night excursion for $889 . The deal also comes with a $75 credit per cabin and a free bottle of wine!

According to Travelzoo, Pride of America is the only ship that sails roundtrip within Hawaii with stops in Maui, Kona and Hilo on the Big Island, and Kauai.

Craving a boat trip to the Bahamas?

Travel-Ticker has got a solution! Starting from just $449, travelers can score a seven-night Bahamas cruise complete with $400 in money-saving coupons and a $25 onboard credit.

Relax and unwind on the white sandy beaches of Great Stirrup Bay, or take a dive with the dolphins in Nassau!

Want more of this week’s top offerings? Check out Travelzoo and Travel-Ticker .

Copyright 2011 Scripps Media, Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.


1 in 5 Brits ‘go abroad without insurance’

Sainsbury’s Travel Insurance has reminded UK holidaymakers of the importance of being insured, following a survey which found that one in five Brits go abroad without cover.

The company described the statistic as “worrying”, given that millions of people will be taking breaks in foreign destinations this summer.

Spain is the country where travellers are most likely to have to seek medical help, according to the research, followed by Turkey and Greece.

The study follows previous analysis by Sainsbury’s Travel Insurance which found that the average medical claim by Britons who fall ill or have an accident overseas is now £1,333.

In the US, the average hospital visit for the company’s policy holders cost £4,725 in 2010, making it the most expensive country for medical care, followed by Thailand, the Dominican Republic, Cyprus and Spain.

Scott Gorman, Sainsbury’s Travel Insurance manager, said: “It’s vitally important for holidaymakers to protect themselves and their family when travelling abroad and the best peace of mind you can have is by having a good quality travel insurance policy.

“Simply having a European Health Insurance Card – which is not an alternative to travel insurance – will only provide you with the same state-provided healthcare as a resident of the country you’re visiting.”

Consumers can learn more about the protection provided by travel insurance by watching this video:

Follow us @travelbite


Food and Travel: Truly Bejazzled!

Dusty Miller

THE August lunch of Greendale Good Food and Wine Appreciation Society was planned to be at Papa’s, Newlands (which used to be Italian eatery Mama Mia’s)

Papa’s is run by the same owners, but the cuisine is now Greek, reflecting the fact that chef-patron Nick Kalamatas was born on a lovely Greek island in the Aegean.
I was never sure why a Greek and his wife/business partner, an Afrikaner, ran one of Zimbabwe’s most successful Italian-style trattorias, but they did…and it worked.
It worked beautifully for many years…going back to the gloriously politically incorrectly named, and hugely popular, Fat Mama’s, which replaced Spago’s (great food; service unbelievably sluggish) at Russell Hotel in The Avenues.
Papa’s Greek specialities, we thought, would be sampled by many of our members for the first time on Friday but…alas and alack! –– two generations of Kalamatases had taken the gap to Greece for the whole of August and a bit of September and the place was depressingly shut.
So I moved lunch to the restaurant next door to Papa’s, to Bejazzled, which –– if your heads are not spinning with this potted history of Newlands hospitality –– used to be the twin-restaurant complex Blue Banana (serving fairly authentic Thai food) and Baobab Grill (a steakhouse).
That was sold by Heath and Lee Stewart about six months ago to local specialist surgeon, the jazz-loving, Aubern Bowers and business partner, James Daniels. The name changed. Much emphasis was placed on live and recorded jazz. Menu remained the same, as did prices.

Air Zimbabwe pantomike
This really was an introduction to the other 11 members who attended. Many of our guys are overseas in August, most of them by arrangement but at least two stuck in the UK due to the pantomime at Air Zimbabwe and the difficulty/cost of finding alterative flights south in school holiday time.
And –– very unusually –– I didn’t hear a word of complaint…not a moan, groan, snide comment or suggestion of sarcasm from any of the Dirty Dozen sitting down to eat.
In fact, far from it: The question on most members’ lips was: “When are we coming back?”
We ordered from the a la carte menu. About half had starters and several went for deep-fried mushrooms which are always popular at such gatherings.
Both “Lucky Eddie” Karnicki, a chartered accountant, sitting on my left and myself were disappointed the restaurant’s trademark Siamese tom-yum, (hot and sour vegetable soup with coriander, lemon grass and chili at US$5) was not available. (Why ever not, I must ask?)

Chicken satay
He settled for chicken satay at US$5. There were three of them, looking (I thought) a bit on the dry side, but Eddie said were quite fine (and he’s eaten them in Thailand).
Still on a soup kick I went for Western-style cream of chicken, which also featured assorted vegetables, especially lovely pearly silverskin onions, which had a great woof of unexpected, but not unwelcome garlic with it.
Other herbs and spices were there but slightly understated and it was crowned with excellent crisp, golden –– even more garlicky –– croutons at US$4.
I’d told Eddie how splendid the outlet’s signature Indian-style slowly cooked lean, boneless lamb curry with steamed rice, chutney and sambals was (at US$20) but again — sadly –– it was “off”.
So we both changed to Thai green chicken curry –– fruity, rich and subtle rather than mindlessly macho hot –– (but they’ll make it that way if you want) strong in mouthwatering coriander at US$15 and accompanied by exemplary fried rice with egg and spring onions folded in (similar to egg-foo-yong) at US$4.
When Bejazzled first opened, all starches were extra: the sort of annoying thing many English restaurants try on. But now (according to James Daniels) whether its chips or mashed potatoes you want, boiled, steamed or fried rice or Pad-Thai egg noodles, tossed in peanut sauce and topped with chopped groundnuts, starch sides are “thrown in” with whichever mains you choose. (So how come I was hit four bucks for fried rice, James?)

Combo dishes
On my right, most guys seemed to go for combo dishes of surf and turf (steak and prawns) or chicken and calamari, dishes which rarely leap out of any menu and say (to me) ORDER!
It may sound a bit snobbish (nothing wrong with that!) but I must agree with the recent comment of some British restaurant reviewer (sorry, didn’t bookmark his name) who thought that the sort of oik who’d want delicious Dublin Bay prawns plonked on an otherwise faultless, tender. cut-with-an-egg spoon, well-hung grass-fed fillet steak is the same make of moron who’d demand tomato ketchup with Lobster Thermidor!
(However, let’s face the fact they’re extremely popular here. Paula, of Paula’s Plaice, Samora Machel Avenue, told me, a couple of nights earlier, that a combo of a quarter chicken, prawns and chips — new on her menu –– was challenging the long established house speciality half a piri-piri chicken, by plates ordered.)

Crepes Suzette
Eddie and I were clearly out of luck on Friday. We both fancied crepes Suzette (US$4) to end, but these –– again –– were on the missing list; we had to make do with pleasant examples of Zimbabwe’s ubiquitous ice-cream and chocolate at a dollar less.
One thing well applauded, was the restaurant’s ability to keep accurate, separate, track of whatever each member ate or drank, rather than come with one single bill baldly stating (for instance) 4 x soups; 3 x prawn cocktails; 2 x fried mushrooms; six fish and chips; two chicken curries; 2 rump steaks; 5 puddings at (say) US$240 and the dreaded “BAR: US$350” leaving it to us to, sometimes fractiously, divi-up and generally sort out.
My bottom line for soup, curry (PLUS rice), sweet and ….hmmm….five!… deliciously refreshing chilled articles of a moderately intoxicating nature (well, we were there from 12:25 until after 3pm!) was US$36.

Bejazzled, Newlands SC, Tel 252269/75 0772 570 019/20. Opens lunch Monday to Friday, supper Monday to Saturday. Live jazz Friday/Saturday nights.

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GREECE – Factors to Watch on August 19


ATHENS |
Fri Aug 19, 2011 3:12am EDT

ATHENS Aug 19 (Reuters) – Here are news stories, press
reports and events, which may affect Greek financial markets on
Friday:

COLLATERAL DEAL WITH FINLAND NEEDS EURO ZONE OKAY-GREEK
FINMIN

Greece’s bilateral deal to put up collateral for Finland’s
share of loans in a new bailout package agreed last month has to
be cleared by the rest of the euro zone, Greece’s finance
minister said on Thursday. [ID:nLDE77H0W0]

AUSTRIANS, DUTCH FOLLOW FINNS, SEEK GREEK COLLATERAL

Austria, the Netherlands and Slovakia said they want
collateral on loans to Greece after Finland secured a
commitment, but a Greek official said this would nullify last
month’s entire bailout deal. [ID:nLDE77H01T]

GREECE NOT IN TALKS ON COLLATERAL WITH EURO PARTNERS
Greece is not discussing with euro zone countries other than
Finland the possibility of providing collateral for their
contribution to a new bailout deal agreed last month, a senior
government official said on Thursday. [ID:nATH006325]

GREEK FINMIN SAYS ADDITIONAL AUSTERITY MAY BE REQUIRED

Greece’s Finance Minister told a cabinet meeting on Thursday
that additional fiscal measures of 3-4 billion euros may be
needed to offset the higher-than-expected recession in Greece,
daily Kathimerini reported, citing unnamed sources.

www.kathimerini.gr

GREEK JAN-JULY TOURIST ARRIVALS UP 10 PCT Y/Y-SETE

Foreign tourist arrivals in Greece rose 10 percent in the
first seven months of the year, industry bodies said on
Thursday, bolstering hopes the key sector will rebound and help
the recession-hit economy. [ID:nLDE77H0G1]

GREEK JUNE C/ACCOUNT GAP NARROWS 14 PCT Y/Y
Greece’s current account deficit shrank 14 percent
year-on-year in June, helped by an improved trade balance and a
higher services surplus, the country’s central bank said on
Thursday. [ID:nLDE77H0FT]

EUROPEAN FACTORS-SHARES TO EXTEND STEEP SELL-OFF ON GROWTH
CONCERNS

European shares were expected to slip further on Friday
after steep declines in the previous session on growing concerns
that the U.S. economy was heading towards another recession and
some European banks faced short-term lending stress.
[ID:nL5E7JI3R8]
================================================================

DISCLAIMER – The content and accuracy of the information
contained in company news releases published on this service is
the responsibility of the originating company and not of
Reuters. While Reuters makes every effort to verify with the
company concerned that any news release is genuine, it does not
perform any other checks to verify the content or accuracy of
the information in question.

For other related news, double click on:
———————————————————-
EUR Money Guide EUR/1 Greek Debt News [DBT-GR]
Greek Equities Guide GR/EQUITY Greece’s Debt GR/DEBT
Greek Economic Indicators [ECI-GR] Government Debt GR/GOVT
Greek Stock News [STX-GR] Greek Money News [M-GR]
Greek Exchange Info GR/EXCH1
———————————————————


Europe takes a break

Italy beach vacation 08 17 2011

LONDON, United Kingdom — Two weeks ago, in the eye of this summer’s two news storms — the phone-hacking scandal and the riots — I met a buddy for lunch on Kingsland High Street.

Like men of a certain age we spent our meal grousing in descending order about the people who rule over us: our wives, children and political leaders; and then moved into the comfort zone of sports. My friend is a lifelong fan of all Boston teams. I am not. So these conversations never reach a natural endpoint.

We paid for lunch and carried on arguing out the door. I walked across Kingsland High Street, a four-lane road that is the main traffic artery from the north into the City, London’s financial district. In the middle of the street, I stopped and decided to make one final point.

When I realized where I was standing I had to ask myself, what’s wrong with this picture? Usually this stretch of road is teeming with traffic at midday. If you stop and stand where I was standing you have a good chance of being smeared across it. Where was everyone? The answer was obvious. They were on vacation.

This led to another question: If Britain’s economy is flatlining — the jobs report released Wednesday showed a jump of 38,000 unemployed in the second quarter 2011 — how can so many people afford to go away?

More from GlobalPost: With the euro in crisis, is Europe finished?

Earlier this year there were dire predictions about what the economic downturn would mean for Britain’s travel and tourism. But Sean Tipton of the Association of British Travel Agents (ABTA) says business has “surged in the last two months.” Tipton added, “40 percent of Britons take a holiday abroad each year. That’s 38 million trips. It will be the same this year.”

The reasons vary. The weather is certainly a factor. Since the summer solstice there have been only two days when the temperature has broken 80 degrees in Britain. Dull, wet and cold days certainly have sent many in search of last-minute holidays in the sun.

More importantly, Britain is not cheap for family holidays even for Britons. Renting a cottage in the Yorkshire Dales for a week in August costs as much or more than renting a cottage in Le Marche in Italy. With gas hovering around $6.46 a gallon an all-inclusive package holiday in the Mediterranean can be a cheaper alternative.

Tipton says that early in the year the traditional Mediterranean destinations, Greece, Spain and Portugal, “realized they needed to lower their prices to become competitive.” They have been successful, the ABTA spokesman points out, “There has been a marked shift of British bookings to those countries.” It’s not just price, however, that has driven the change. “Political instability has driven people away from North Africa — Tunisia and Egypt, especially. Turkey has suffered a drop in tourism — but to a lesser extent.”

More tourism from GlobalPost: Up, up, and away, photos from the Bristonal International Balloon Fiesta

I called ABTA’s sister organization in continental Europe, ECTAA, to get information on whether the trends in Britain were mirrored on the continent. I was told the person I needed to interview, Michel DeBlust, was on vacation. But there is no reason to think that Germans, Swedes and Danes are any different than the Brits. For the Greeks, the Spanish and the Portuguese in particular, that is a good thing.

Greece in particular needs a big summer season — between 15 and 20 percent of its GDP comes from tourism. Spain is almost as dependent on tourism, around 11 percent of its GDP comes from foreign visitors. Ten thousand jobs have been lost in Spain’s tourism sector over the last three years. As holiday makers return to Spain that number will improve. In a country with an official unemployment rate of 20 percent that is good news.

There is another reason why the economic downturn has not stopped Europeans from grabbing a vacation. Unlike in America, where there is no law saying employers must give employees time off, every country in Europe makes paid vacation a statutory requirement. It’s not that people here aren’t busy. They simply have to take time off. Not every one jumps on a plane and flies to another country. If you were French or Italian why would you bother? You have beach, you have Alps, you probably have grandparents with whom to leave the kids — and all within a day’s drive.

More from GlobalPost: 2011’s unknown travel destinations

And if southern Europeans want to escape the heat they can always fly to London where the pound’s devaluation against the euro over the last 36 months means that they can just about afford to visit. Certainly, the number of Spanish and Italian families riding the London Underground at the moment shows that the British capital is an attractive destination.

About the only people not having a quiet vacation this summer are Europe’s political leaders. British Prime Minister David Cameron had to fly back from Chiantishire, aka Tuscany, to deal with the riots. He didn’t want to be alone so he summoned all of parliament back from holiday to join him. French President Nicholas Sarkozy and German Chancellor Angela Merkel have probably had more time together in the last two weeks than they have had with their respective spouses.

But then August has always been a dangerous month for politicians to go away. Twenty years ago this month, Mikhail Gorbachev flew to the Crimea for vacation and found himself overthrown in a coup. Ten years ago this month, President Bush was so busy clearing brush at his Crawford, Tex., ranch that he missed the import of a national security briefing paper titled, “Bin Laden Determined to Strike in U.S.”


Tourist Visits, Spending in Greece Rise in First Half of Year

Spending by non-residents in Greece
increased 12.6 percent in the first half of the year from a year
earlier as the number of tourist arrivals increased.

The number of non-resident visits rose 13.9 percent between
January and June, compared with the first six months of 2010,
the Bank of Greece said in a statement posted on its website
today.

The improvement in the tourism industry helped narrow the
country’s current account deficit, which decreased 258 million
euros ($371 million) to 1.58 billion euros in the first half,
according to the statement.

Tourism accounts for about 16 percent of Greece’s gross
domestic product, according to the London-based World Travel and
Tourism Council
.

To contact the reporter on this story:
Marcus Bensasson in Athens at
[email protected]

To contact the editor responsible for this story:
Craig Stirling at
[email protected]


Europe takes a break

Italy beach vacation 08 17 2011

LONDON, United Kingdom — Two weeks ago, in the eye of this summer’s two news storms — the phone-hacking scandal and the riots — I met a buddy for lunch on Kingsland High Street.

Like men of a certain age we spent our meal grousing in descending order about the people who rule over us: our wives, children and political leaders; and then moved into the comfort zone of sports. My friend is a lifelong fan of all Boston teams. I am not. So these conversations never reach a natural endpoint.

We paid for lunch and carried on arguing out the door. I walked across Kingsland High Street, a four-lane road that is the main traffic artery from the north into the City, London’s financial district. In the middle of the street, I stopped and decided to make one final point.

When I realized where I was standing I had to ask myself, what’s wrong with this picture? Usually this stretch of road is teeming with traffic at midday. If you stop and stand where I was standing you have a good chance of being smeared across it. Where was everyone? The answer was obvious. They were on vacation.

This led to another question: If Britain’s economy is flatlining — the jobs report released Wednesday showed a jump of 38,000 unemployed in the second quarter 2011 — how can so many people afford to go away?

More from GlobalPost: With the euro in crisis, is Europe finished?

Earlier this year there were dire predictions about what the economic downturn would mean for Britain’s travel and tourism. But Sean Tipton of the Association of British Travel Agents (ABTA) says business has “surged in the last two months.” Tipton added, “40 percent of Britons take a holiday abroad each year. That’s 38 million trips. It will be the same this year.”

The reasons vary. The weather is certainly a factor. Since the summer solstice there have been only two days when the temperature has broken 80 degrees in Britain. Dull, wet and cold days certainly have sent many in search of last-minute holidays in the sun.

More importantly, Britain is not cheap for family holidays even for Britons. Renting a cottage in the Yorkshire Dales for a week in August costs as much or more than renting a cottage in Le Marche in Italy. With gas hovering around $6.46 a gallon an all-inclusive package holiday in the Mediterranean can be a cheaper alternative.

Tipton says that early in the year the traditional Mediterranean destinations, Greece, Spain and Portugal, “realized they needed to lower their prices to become competitive.” They have been successful, the ABTA spokesman points out, “There has been a marked shift of British bookings to those countries.” It’s not just price, however, that has driven the change. “Political instability has driven people away from North Africa — Tunisia and Egypt, especially. Turkey has suffered a drop in tourism — but to a lesser extent.”

More tourism from GlobalPost: Up, up, and away, photos from the Bristonal International Balloon Fiesta

I called ABTA’s sister organization in continental Europe, ECTAA, to get information on whether the trends in Britain were mirrored on the continent. I was told the person I needed to interview, Michel DeBlust, was on vacation. But there is no reason to think that Germans, Swedes and Danes are any different than the Brits. For the Greeks, the Spanish and the Portuguese in particular, that is a good thing.

Greece in particular needs a big summer season — between 15 and 20 percent of its GDP comes from tourism. Spain is almost as dependent on tourism, around 11 percent of its GDP comes from foreign visitors. Ten thousand jobs have been lost in Spain’s tourism sector over the last three years. As holiday makers return to Spain that number will improve. In a country with an official unemployment rate of 20 percent that is good news.

There is another reason why the economic downturn has not stopped Europeans from grabbing a vacation. Unlike in America, where there is no law saying employers must give employees time off, every country in Europe makes paid vacation a statutory requirement. It’s not that people here aren’t busy. They simply have to take time off. Not every one jumps on a plane and flies to another country. If you were French or Italian why would you bother? You have beach, you have Alps, you probably have grandparents with whom to leave the kids — and all within a day’s drive.

More from GlobalPost: 2011’s unknown travel destinations

And if southern Europeans want to escape the heat they can always fly to London where the pound’s devaluation against the euro over the last 36 months means that they can just about afford to visit. Certainly, the number of Spanish and Italian families riding the London Underground at the moment shows that the British capital is an attractive destination.

About the only people not having a quiet vacation this summer are Europe’s political leaders. British Prime Minister David Cameron had to fly back from Chiantishire, aka Tuscany, to deal with the riots. He didn’t want to be alone so he summoned all of parliament back from holiday to join him. French President Nicholas Sarkozy and German Chancellor Angela Merkel have probably had more time together in the last two weeks than they have had with their respective spouses.

But then August has always been a dangerous month for politicians to go away. Twenty years ago this month, Mikhail Gorbachev flew to the Crimea for vacation and found himself overthrown in a coup. Ten years ago this month, President Bush was so busy clearing brush at his Crawford, Tex., ranch that he missed the import of a national security briefing paper titled, “Bin Laden Determined to Strike in U.S.”


Discover the islands of Greece with free iPhone apps

Visit the beautiful islands of Greece with the information of free iPhone applications to assist you in discovering many great places. After a recent trip to Kefalonia, I found my uneducated view of what Greek islands can contain was very wrong. Expecting packed beaches and drunken holidaymakers, I arrived to a beautiful part world that seemed to be untouched by the commercial style of the clubbing scene. After visiting Myrtos Bay, Melissani and the Drogarati caves, I was told of many historical events that have happened to this island and the other neighboring islands, from mythical tales of Greek gods to Captain Corelli’s Mandolin and devastating earthquakes. Within my time there, I was totally smitten and have got the bug now to visit the other islands. With many other Greek islands to visit, we have come up with five free apps for you to look at.

iKefalonia by iKefalonia App is available to download through the iTunes App Store. This application is a useful guide for every traveler. Find out all about the largest island of the Ionian Sea. Packed full of valuable information the user will also get general details the island, beaches, towns, local weather, attractions, hotels, entertainment, maps, beautiful photos and useful telephone numbers. Learn about the historical background such as the Venetian rule and the beautiful capital of Argostoli. This is the ideal app for exploring the whole island.

iZante by iKefalonia App is the ideal app for getting all the valuable information required to enhance your stay. Using this travel guide, you will be able to access the history of the island with attractions, beaches, useful telephone numbers, restaurants, clubs and lots more. View beautiful images and find out about the local weather. Available at the App Store this is a great way to view Zakynthos also known as Zante.

iChania by iKefalonia App is available to download at the App Store. Chania also known as Crete is the largest island of the Aegean Sea. This is a premium travel guide to the beautiful Greek island with information on everything from the beaches to the history. Obtain valuable information on where to go and what to do while enjoying you stay. Find out about weather conditions and the best places to eat.

Mykonos by iKefalonia App is a great informative app ensuring you make the best of your time here. Make life easier without worrying about what you are going to do, where you going to stay or where you are going to eat. Find out historic facts about the most Cosmopolitan Greek Island. All information includes links and places on a map. This handy application will let you in on attractions, activities and various information about the island. Available at the App Store.

iParos by iKefalonia App is a useful guide providing information about your holiday with helpful tips on where to go, where to stay and what is available. Find out about local beaches, the weather, attractions and lots of other useful knowledge. Learn about the history behind the island and view stunning images. This application is available at the App Store and contains all you need to know about this beautiful Greek Island.

Once you have entered the warm sea with tame fishes swimming around and the sun beaming down you will get that feeling that you really are blessed. Using free apps can help you with allsorts all aspects of enjoying your holiday, from interesting history to beautiful scenes.


Greek Current Account Deficit Narrows In June

(RTTNews) – Greece’s current account deficit decreased from last year in June, data released by Bank of Greece showed Thursday.

The current account deficit dropped to EUR 1.58 billion in June from EUR 1.84 billion in the same period last year.

The goods trade account showed a deficit of EUR 2.09 billion during the month, lower than last year’s EUR 2.27 billion deficit. Export receipts, excluding oil and ships, moved up by 11.1 percent during the month while the import bill remained almost unchanged.

The surplus in the services account increased to EUR 1.88 billion from EUR 1.75 billion in June 2010, mainly owing to higher net travel receipts and lower net payments for ‘other’ services.

The balance in the income account was a deficit of EUR 1.32 billion in June, up from the EUR 1.25 billion deficit recorded a year earlier.

The deficit in the current transfers account dropped to EUR 53.1 million from EUR 76.8 million last year, while in the capital transfers account the deficit edged down to EUR 10.5 million from EUR 11 million.

The financial account showed a surplus of EUR 1.51 billion during the month, lower than last year’s EUR 1.74 billion surplus.

by RTT Staff Writer

For comments and feedback: [email protected]