Greece Braces For Strikes Ahead of Polls

ATHENS—Greek workers were gearing up for May Day strikes Tuesday over ongoing austerity measures that have pushed the country deep into recession, days before elections in which the country’s two ruling parties must convince voters of the need for fresh cutbacks.

The traditional May Day strike is expected to bring Greece to a standstill with hundreds of thousands of public and private sector workers walking off the job in commemoration of the labor movement, shuttering shops and closing most central and local government offices.

Public transport services in and around the capital, Athens, are expected to be disrupted by a …


Greeks old and young united in disdain for ruling parties

Reuters

5:11 a.m. CDT, April 29, 2012


Travel books: A worldwide hit with collectors

The collecting of travel books can lead to many discoveries and insights into the world at large, according to rare book expert Kenneth Gloss.

By Kenneth Gloss

Winter is primetime for journeys to far-away lands by way of one’s imagination but even late Spring gives time to get serious about Summer journeys! A collection of travel books is a great way to sample life in other countries and learn about their culture and history. From the very first travel guide put out by Baedekers in Germany, collectors and travelers alike have been fascinated with books that provide a colorful verbal and sometimes pictorial view of the world.

The Baedekers are some of the best guides ever produced and can sell for $10 and up, depending on the rarity and condition. These mini-books had been written specifically to be used on trips and were not designed to last for generations. Thus, many of those guides did not survive much beyond the journeys for which they were used. Generally, though, travel guides for popular destinations like Paris, London and Germany are plentiful. In the U.S., Niagara Falls has the distinction of having the most travel guides written about it because it is a perennial honeymoon and family vacation spot. Bermuda is also popular with collectors, both British and American.

As one gets a little more off the beaten travel path, old guides become rarer and more valuable. Guides for Greece are rarer than for Paris, while finding a guide for a country like Syria is even rarer. One of the reasons tourist books on Syria are difficult to find is that the country used to prohibit them. The old guides to Syria contain a note that advises hiding it in a pocket before crossing the border because the guards would often confiscate them. That little side note is just one of the interesting tidbits you can find tucked inside a travel guidebook. With tourism down to many countries currently, they still make for absorbing reading and learning.

Guides to Russia are also rare. When communism closed the borders in 1917, travel writers were not allowed in to document the sites for many years, leaving a hole in the Russian travel guide history. Russian guidebooks had been one of the best sources for accurate maps. The State Department bought many because it was one of the few places where maps for the area were available. Therefore, there are not as many of them available to collectors today. A Russian guidebook will sell for $200-$350 because it is far rarer than guides to other countries.

Travel guides are more than just information; they make incredibly interesting historical references as well. If you collect all the guides available on a particular area over a large period of time, you can gain an amazing picture of the culture and society of that area. Travel guides point out what areas people deemed important, how the buildings and streets changed and what was popular at the time. Even any advertisements in the book can be a valuable reference to the society and its culture.

Travel guides were produced by a variety of transportation industries in an effort to entice people to travel. During the mid-1800s, the railroads produced a number of books that focused on the West. Some of the railroad companies even built their own hotels and resorts, and would then feature those places in the guides. The railroads were one of the biggest promoters of travel books to the public. Later, steamship companies, auto clubs and airlines began producing travel guides. Oil companies also published a number of these books, complete with listings of gas stations, as did Duncan Hines with eateries around the country. The components of the travel guide, whether it pointed out depots, gas stations or docks, were directly related to what conveyance the traveler was using and which company was producing the book.

Before photography, the pictures in travel guides were hand-drawn. Some of the artwork in these booklets is exquisite. The prints inside are often detailed enough to be framed and many collectors look for travel guides with particular artistic merits.

There are mainly two types of travel guide collectors. The first is the person who is fascinated with reading travel accounts and loves to learn about the history of different places throughout the world. They can travel the world, journeying to a different country every night, just by reading a variety of travel guides. The second is the armchair traveler, a person who may have always dreamed of circling the globe, but never got a chance. Some people spend their entire lives planning a trip to a particular destination and collecting guides on the area. It’s sad to buy these guides from an estate and learn that Grandma or Uncle Joe always dreamed of traveling to Paris, but died before that trip became a reality. A handful of travel guides from years ago were even written by armchair travelers who never went beyond their local library to gather research. These particular books don’t depict as true a picture of an area as one where the writer actually made the journey.

The best part about collecting travel guides is the cost. For relatively little money, you can start collecting these books. They are also easy to find. Travel guides pop up in boxes at garage sales, inside antique shops and at flea markets. If you are concentrating your collection on a certain area or specific time period, it may take a little more effort to find the right books but the payoff is worth it. Like the gold miners who sorted through gallons of water and tons of rock to find a single nugget, an industrious travel guide collector can search through the stacks in a bookshop or the boxes at an auction to unearth that tiny treasure that will top off a collection.

Ken Gloss is the owner of the Brattle Book Shop in Boston, the oldest antiquarian bookstore in America celebrating its 62nd year of Gloss family ownership. Mr. Gloss has appeared on PBS’ Antiques Roadshow with some frequency. Visit the Web site at: www.brattlebookshop.com or call 1-800-447-9595 for information about free and open lectures. The shop is located at 9West Street in the Downtown Crossing section of Boston.


FEATURE: Greek anger keeps German tourists away


CORINTH, Greece |
Wed Apr 25, 2012 10:09pm IST

CORINTH, Greece (Reuters) – German tourists are in short supply in Greece these days, frightened away by reports of visceral anti-German sentiment in some places, fears of being stranded by strikes and television images of fiery anti-austerity riots.

Who in their right mind, after all, would want to go on holiday to a place where they might be called a Nazi?

The dearth of Germans is especially noticeable in tourist hotspots like Corinth, an enchanting ancient town 80 km west of Athens famous for the steep and narrow walls of its 6-km (4-mile) long canal that cuts across the Peloponnesian Peninsula.

Because tourism accounts for a disproportionately large 15 percent of Greece’s gross domestic product (GDP) and Germans are the largest group of visitors, their absence is causing pain.

“The Germans aren’t coming here this year but there’s no reason for them to be afraid,” said Nicki Nastouli, who works at a tourist shop and restaurant near the rim of the Corinth Canal. “They’re not coming because of the problems. But we don’t have a problem with German people, only their government.”

And what a problem. Rioting protesters in Athens have taken to burning German flags and carrying around effigies of Chancellor Angela Merkel in a Nazi uniform. Greek newspaper cartoons depict Merkel and Finance Minister Wolfgang Schaeuble as concentration camp guards with Greeks held inside.

“No one in Greece likes Merkel,” said Yannis Kalyerakos, 51, an airport manager visiting the canal with his family. “Greeks have no problem with Germans – even though it’s their German government that is blaming the Greeks for everything wrong.”

A plunge in advance bookings from Germany may lead to overall tourism revenues falling 5 percent in 2012, said Greek Tourism Enterprises head Andreas Andreadis.

“It’s not just politicians fighting anymore,” he told Reuters. “It’s come down to the people of the countries, Germany and Greece. We need to restore relations between the two people and leave out any differences among bankers and politicians.”

Data for the main summer holiday season shows pre-bookings from Germany down by some 30 percent. In Berlin, a tour manager for a leading travel agency, said interest in Greece holidays was drying up.

“A lot of people are hesitant to go to Greece because there are reports Germans are being insulted and there’s a fear about possible strikes,” said the manager named Matthias. “Only diehard Greek fans are still booking there.”

CHANGE THE FACE OF EUROPE

Greeks complain that Merkel’s government – which demands harsh spending cuts as a price for debt bailouts – is strangling their economy, worsening a five-year-long meltdown that has left nearly a quarter of Greek workers jobless.

Emotions are running high ahead of a snap May 6 election, the first since the debt crisis erupted in 2009.

The country’s two main ruling parties are expected to haemorrhage support. Fringe parties that stand to sweep into parliament channel anti-German resentment.

“Today’s German leadership is trying to change the face of Europe,” said Panos Kammenos, the leader of a rebel right wing party known as “Independent Greeks” which has come out of nowhere to 11 percent in opinion polls.

“It tries to turn a Europe of independent states into a Europe dominated by Germany,” he told Reuters.

Most Greeks accept they need to make deep changes after decades of profligate state spending. But many believe German policymakers want to go further – to inflict punishment for their easygoing culture – even if it makes the crisis worse.

“Merkel and her government want to change the way of life for Greeks,” said Marina Metsopoulos, 43, a waitress at a not-so-busy Corinth cafe. “We have a different lifestyle. Now they want to impose theirs on us. They want to degrade the Greek lifestyle. This is an ‘economic war’ by Germany against Greece.”

Metsopoulos, who grew up in Canada before returning to Greece, said the crisis had revived anti-German sentiment from World War Two that most thought had long since disappeared.

Greeks suffered atrocities at the hands of the Nazis and their fascist allies during the war. In Athens alone, 300,000 civilians died of starvation during an occupation that lasted over three years. Generations on, it had become a subject that Greeks no longer dwelled on, but it comes up a lot more now.

“The Greeks moved on and tried to forget,” Metsopoulos said. “Then this. If you ask me, Germany owes Greece billions for all the murders and war crimes. Germany should pay Greece what it owes.”

Michelle Lavender, a 56-year-old British woman who has lived in Greece for 11 years, said she can understand the exasperation against Germany following years of finger-wagging and tough talk from German politicians, especially their second tier leaders.

“There is such a loathing of the German government because of the way they’ve picked on Greece as if Greece is the sole reason for the euro zone’s problems,” she said. “Greece is being treated like the scapegoat for everything that’s gone wrong.”

But lashing out in public about Germans only brings more hardship on Greeks. Tourism employs about a fifth of Greece’s 4 million-strong workforce, and Germans account for about 14 percent of visitors each year, more than any other nation.

Germans who have come to Greece anyway, say that Greece is as hospitable as ever.

“We’re having a great time and the Greeks are incredibly friendly,” said Christine Peters, a 30-year-old mechanic from Munich in Greece with her husband.

But she wasn’t surprised that many of her countrymen are staying away. “That’s just the way Germans are: if there’s trouble in some country, then Germans just don’t go there on their holidays.”

(Additional reporting by Renee Maltezou and Harry Papachristou; Editing by Peter Graff)


Readers' travel tips: Walks in Europe

Winning tip: The Pelion peninsula, Greece

This peninsula on the Aegean is crisscrossed with a network of ancient kalderimi (stone donkey paths) and monopati (unpaved footpaths). These link the hilltop villages and the picturesque fishing harbours, sandy beaches and secluded coves. Walks take you through plane trees in the valleys and olive and pine trees on the hills. You’ll find small springs of cool, pure water, glimpses of the sapphire Aegean and splendid sunsets over the Pagasitikos gulf. Enjoy a tsipouro brandy and a meal of delicious regional cuisine at journey’s end.
pelionwalks.wordpress.com
JulietE

Netherlands

Wadden Sea
No trail to follow, no signposts marking your way and once you’ve set off there is no way back. Join a guided mud walk from the mainland to one of the islands off the coast. Challenged by the incoming tide, you wade through the mud and cross hip-deep watercourses. When you’re surrounded only by the sound of the wind and the sea birds it is not hard to see why the Wadden Sea is a Unesco world heritage site.
wadlopen.net
nienkewolters

France


Sainte-Agnes, France
Ste-Agnes, the highest mountain village on the Mediterranean. Photograph: Alamy

Hiking above the Côte d’Azur, Menton
The GR51 hiking trail is known as the balcony of the Côte d’Azur, and passes through some of the highest coastal villages in France. It is possible to do the leg from Sainte-Agnès to Gorbio on a day trip from Nice by taking a train to Menton then a bus to Sainte-Agnès. The trek via the highest peak in between the two villages takes up to six hours, with breathtaking views of coast, sea and mountains.
gr-infos.com/gr51a.htm
GoranLondon

Lac Blanc, Pralognan-la-Vanoise
The Lac Blanc, at 2,500m, is at the heart of the Vanoise national park. Leave your car at Pont de la Pêche near Pralognan. The climb to the lake takes three hours, allow a further two-and-a-half for the return journey. Amid the beautiful mountains and colourful flora, you might see marmots, ibexes and chamois. The Lac Blanc is quite a sight – mineral deposits give it a strange milky colour – and its shores are an ideal picnic spot.
montagne-photos.org/descrip_lac_blanc.htm
Christel73


Balagne Landscape, Corsica
La Balagne, Corsica. Photograph: Alamy

La Balagne, Corsica
The region of La Balagne, northern Corsica, is crisscrossed with walking paths, ranging from the sedate to those requiring crampons.The mountains and valleys are wild, unspoilt and crowd-free, scattered with fig, olive and chestnut trees and fragrant maquis. From timeless mountain villages such as Ville-di-Paraso and Speloncato there are stunning views across the Regino valley towards the distant coast, and as the light changes in the afternoon, the jutting ridges of granite glow pink. Late spring and early summer are the best times for walking; July and August are usually too hot.
balagne-corsica.com
Troutiemcfish

Grand Balcon Nord, Chamonix
Get up close to Mont Blanc, Europe’s highest mountain, on the spectacular yet easy 6.5km Grand Balcon Nord walk (about three hours). From Chamonix take the Aiguille cable car to the halfway point at Plan de l’Aiguille. The well-signposted rocky trail meanders through miniature rhododendrons, gentian and azaleas. At the Montenvers railway turn right and zigzag easily up the extra 150m to grab great views of the pinnacles of the Aiguille Verte at 4,122m, Les Drus and the Mer de Glace (sea of ice). Catch the picturesque little train from Montenvers back to Chamonix – checking the time of the last train and cable car, as it’s a long walk down! This walk can be done in reverse: start early and see the sun come up from behind Les Aiguilles.
chamonix.com
Anshir

Italy

The Cinque Terre, Liguria
This walk links five hilltop villages. The paths are a combination of rugged steps and narrow soil pathways that hug the steep and jagged coastline as they meander through fragrant olive and lemon groves. Buy a pass for the train connecting the five villages – this is handy if a path is closed, and lets you walk the paths in any order depending on fitness and time.
cinqueterre.com/eng/information/card
Llanfairgirl

Three Peaks, Dolomites, South Tirol
The awe-inspiring 3,000m-high Three Peaks are in the beautiful South Tirol. The view of the steep north wall is considered a landmark of the Dolomites. Off the beaten track there are opportunities to watch hawks and gazelles. We set off from the town of Sesto and arrived at the top in four hours. Halfway up there is a place to rest and buy food and refreshment, and before you reach the top there is another Alpine Inn. Magical!
Inga Moss-Jones

Switzerland

Schynige Platte to First, Bernese Oberland
This is a classic Alpine hike, which is easily undertaken in a day by the reasonably fit and has the added benefit of a low carbon footprint as access to the start and finish is by rail. You take a train from Interlaken to Wilderswil and then the cog railway to Schynige Platte at 2,000m for breakfast with spectacular views of the Eiger, Mönch and Jungfrau. You then follow a well-signed path to First, enjoying magnificent views of Interlaken, Thunersee and Brienzersee. You pass the Faulhorn, at 2,600m, topped by its hotel, built in 1830, then descend via Grindelwald for a train to Interlaken.
walkingswitzerland.com/walks/walk_descrip/8006
NormanBaker

Sargans to Lake Geneva via Grindelwald
The Alpine Pass route is a 14-day walk from one side of Switzerland to the other. It starts on the eastern border and finishes at Lake Geneva, going through some of the most spectacular scenery in Europe. As the name suggests you walk an alpine pass each day (occasionally two) but each evening you end up at a town, village or hamlet so you don’t need to use mountain huts. We did it in September and only booked one night’s accommodation in advance; the rest of the time you could just turn up and find somewhere with no problem.
For a detailed guide see cicerone.co.uk
HelenSmith

Greece


Meteora monastery
Monastery St Nicolaos Anapafsas, Meteora. Photograph: Alamy

The monasteries of Meteora
Greece offers no stranger walking than between the sandstone needles of Meteora. Monasteries perched on the outcrops were once accessed by rope ladders. Now there are steps, and larger sites such as Holy Monastery Of Great Meteoron are busy. The hawks hunting in the thermals below, and the black-frocked priests hugging their knees in the simple cable car back down to the staff car park, make it worth the climb.
zumbido

Slovenia

The Soca valley, Kobarid
From the small town of Kobarid you can follow the amazingly aquamarine Soca river upstream to the Kozjak waterfall. Climb through the forest and discover some small churches and a brilliant Indiana Jones-esque swing bridge. If you take the circular route back, you walk through alpine fields with brightly coloured beehives. You are surrounded by the Julian Alps soaring to 2,864m.
tnp.si/national_park
nwhittington

Portugal

Arouca Geopark
There’s great hillside scenery here – but also peculiar natural features, such as minerals that pop out of rocks when heated in the sun and boulders sculpted into weird shapes. There are 16 signed walks (percursos pedestres), from six to 19 km. Walk 15 is 17km long and of medium difficulty, rising to more than 1,000m at Monte Calvo.
geoparquearouca.com
PgeolP

Spain

Pico Pierzo, Asturias
Park by the signpost on the road between San Juan de Beleño and Viego for this spectacular 10km walk in the Ponga national park. In September we walked through a carpet of purple crocuses and exuberant thistles. We saw no one apart from some old men in a hut who offered us water, unless vultures, choughs and the odd goat count. If you make the summit, you’ll see the sea – we didn’t as the final ascent is vertiginous – but the views of endless rolling green hills as we gradually ascended the ridge made this the most memorable afternoon’s walk I’ve ever done.
Maps from posadadelvalle.com
CornishJay

Camino Portugés, Santiago de Compostela
You don’t have to be religious to walk the old pilgrim routes to Santiago de Compostela. With hostels that charge about €5 a night at every 20km or so, following this more than 1000-year-long tradition won’t break the bank. The Camino Portugués is a less crowded alternative to the main route from France. It follows old Roman roads through vineyards and ancient oak forests, past beautiful rias (coastal inlets) and historic towns such as Barcelos and Pontevedra. The 295km from Porto can be covered in about a fortnight.
csj.org.uk
AnnaReg

Mulhácen from Trevélez, Sierra Nevada
This is a challenging, beautiful walk up Spain’s highest mountain. Trevélez is one of the highest settlements in Spain, and almost at the head of the valley there are several restaurants with roof terraces where you can dine surrounded by mountains. The climb should take six or seven hours but rather than do it all in one go, it’s great to camp at Siete Lagunas, about 150m below the summit. You are high, almost 3,500m, so it is worth having a good sleeping bag. The walk takes you through ancient fields where the Moors built irrigation channels that still contain fast-flowing water. Next day, rise early, climb to the summit, then double back along the ridge to a small village called Capileira. This will take a day but you should in time for a beer and supper back in civilisation.
From Malaga, take a bus to Orgiva, then another for Trevélez (alpujarras.eu)
ollyt

Romania


Bucegi mountains, Romania
Walking among rock formations in the Bucegi mountains. Photograph: Alamy

Bucegi mountains
The Bucegi mountains are fantastic, not least because there’s a cable car to the top. Then it’s an undulating plateau culminating in the huge Caraiman cross at 2,260m, overlooking the valley directly and vertiginously below. It’s airy and easy and fairly quiet until the cross is close.
montania.ro/en_Sinaia_S.htm
AJClark

Slovakia

Sulovske Skaly nature reserve
Climb, hike and cycle among the rock towers, gorges and ravines of this beautiful but unknown part of Slovakia – but hurry before everyone else discovers Sulovske Skaly too. Lower in altitude than the better-known Tatras to the north-east, it has rock towers, needles, windows and gates separated by deep waterless gorges and ravines. Its forested and round-topped limestone ridges are also much more typical of Slovakia than the Tatras, but you’ll find little tourist infrastructure and few English speakers.
For more details see bootandbike.co.uk
jillap


Greece Suicides: Increasing Suicide Numbers Cause Alarm

By Erik Kirschbaum
ATHENS, April 28 (Reuters) – On Monday, a 38-year-old geology lecturer hanged himself from a lamp post in Athens and on the same day a 35-year-old priest jumped to his death off his balcony in northern Greece. On Wednesday, a 23-year-old student shot himself in the head.
In a country that has had one of the lowest suicide rates in the world, a surge in the number of suicides in the wake of an economic crisis has shocked and gripped the Mediterranean nation – and its media – before a May 6 election.
The especially grisly death of pharmacist Dimitris Christoulas, who shot himself in the head on a central Athens square because of poverty brought on by the crisis that has put millions out of work, was by far the most dramatic.
Before shooting himself during morning rush hour on April 4 on Syntagma Square across from the Greek parliament building, the 77-year-old pensioner took a moment to jot down a note.
“I see no other solution than this dignified end to my life so I don’t find myself fishing through garbage cans for sustenance,” wrote Christoulas, who has since become a national symbol of the austerity-induced pain that is squeezing millions.
Greek media have since reported similar suicides almost daily, worsening a sense of gloom going into next week’s election, called after Prime Minister Lucas Papademos’s interim government completed its mandate to secure a new rescue deal from foreign creditors by cutting spending further.
Some medical experts say this form of political suicide is a reflection of the growing despair and sense of helplessness many feel. But others warn the media may be amplifying the crisis mood with its coverage and numbers may only be up slightly.
“The crisis has triggered a growing sense of guilt, a loss of self-esteem and humiliation for many Greeks,” Nikos Sideris, a leading psychoanalyst and author in Athens, told Reuters.
“Greek people don’t want to be a burden to anyone and there’s this growing sense of helplessness. Some develop an attitude of self-hatred and that leads to self-destruction. That’s what’s behind the increase in suicide and attempted suicide. We’re seeing a whole new category: political suicides.”
Police said the geology lecturer, Nikos Polyvos, who hanged himself, was distraught because a teaching job offer had been blocked due to a blanket hiring freeze in the public sector.

NATION IN SHOCK
Experts say the numbers are relatively low – less than about 600 per year. But increases in suicides, attempted suicides, the use of anti-depressant medication and the need for psychiatric care are causing alarm in a nation unaccustomed to the problems.
Before the financial crisis began wreaking havoc in 2009, Greece had one of the lowest suicide rates in the world – 2.8 per 100,000 inhabitants. There was a 40 percent rise in suicides in the first half of 2010, according to the Health Ministry.
There are no reliable statistics on 2011 but experts say Greece’s suicide rate has probably doubled to about 5 per 100,000. That is still far below levels of 34 per 100,000 seen in Finland or 9 per 100,000 in Germany. Attempted suicides and demand for psychiatric help has risen as Greece struggles to cope with the worst economic crisis since World War Two.
Nikiforos Angelopoulos, a professor of psychiatry, has a busy psychotherapy practice in an upmarket Athens neighbourhood. He said the crisis has exacerbated the problems for some already less stable people and estimates that about five percent of his patients have developed problems due to the crisis.
“We’re a nation in shock,” he said, even though he suspected that it was the media coverage of suicides that had increased dramatically rather than the actual numbers of suicides. He nevertheless says the crisis is behind a notable rise in mental health problems in Greece.
“I had one patient who came in with a severe depression – he owns a furniture making company that got into financial trouble and he had to lay off 20 of his 100 workers,” he said. “He couldn’t sleep and couldn’t eat because of that. He said his good business was being ruined and he couldn’t cope anymore.”
The furniture maker spent four months in therapy and was also helped by anti-depressants, Angelopoulos said.
“He’s better now. He realised what happened just happened. But there are many others who are unstable or psychotic to begin with and the crisis is increasing their anxiety and insecurity.”
Angelopoulos, 60, has also suffered himself because about 20 percent of his patients can no longer afford his 100 euro ($130) per hour sessions. Some have asked for a half-price discount while others tell him they simply can’t afford to pay anything.
“I never turn people away,” he said. “If a patient says to me ‘I have no money’, I couldn’t tell them to go away. I tell them okay you don’t have to pay now but remember me later.”

HAPPY GREEKS?
There are several possible explanations for Greece’s low suicide rate that go beyond the fact that the country has an abundance of sunshine and balmy weather.
To avoid stigmatising their families, some suicidal Greeks deliberately crash their cars, which police often charitably report as accidents. Families often try to cover up a suicide so their loved ones can be buried because the Greek Orthodox church refuses to officiate at burials of people who commit suicide.
Another important factor behind the low suicide rate is that Greeks have extremely close knit families as well as a highly communicative and expressive culture.
“Greece is a country where everyone will talk to you,” said Sideris, the Athens psychoanalyst. “You’ll always find someone to share your suffering with and someone’s always there to help.
“It’s not only the good weather. It’s the powerful network of support that has made the suicide rate in Greece so low. It’s still there but this crisis is still too much for some people.”
Many Greeks have also not lost their sense of humour.
Dimitris Nikolopoulos, a 37-year-old salesman, laughed at the idea that the suicide rate was so low because Greeks are well-adjusted and a generally happy people.
“Greeks used to be very happy people because we were living off money that didn’t belong to us,” he said with a wry smile. “But sometimes you have to face reality. It wasn’t our money.”

Earlier on HuffPost:



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Greek unrest could put off travellers

In February William Hague, the Foreign Secretary, angered travel companies by
announcing plans to evacuate Britons from the country in the event of major
civil unrest – a statement that some operators have blamed for the continued
slump in holiday bookings.

Although there are no restrictions on Britons visiting Greece, the Foreign
Office warns holidaymakers there to expect regular strikes, occasionally
violent demonstrations and disruption to public transport. See fco.gov.uk
for more information.

Would you consider a holiday in Greece this summer?

Ten of the best deals to Greece

Mykonos

Save 25 per cent on a one-week stay at the five-star La Residence in Mykonos.
Seven night’s accommodation, including flights, transfers, breakfast,
champagne on arrival and a three-course dinner, costs from £619 per person,
based on selected dates until October 7. Book by April 29. See www.hand-picked.telegraph.co.uk

Kefalonia

A seven-night stay at the self-catering Marketos Studios in Svoronata,
Kefalonia, costs £309.50 per person (was £705.50), including flights from
Gatwick. Price is based on a July 1 departure. See holidays.monarch.co.uk

One week at the self-catering three-star Mythos Apartments in Kefalonia costs
from £147 per person, including flights, based on a May 8 departure. See olympicholidays.com

Zakynthos

Two weeks at the three-star Vasilikos Beach Hotel costs from £353 per person,
based on a May 17 departure. Prices include flights from Gatwick. See www.manos.co.uk.

Pefkos

One week at the self-catering Stella Apartments in Pefkos costs from £131 per
person (was £806), based on a May 12 departure. The price includes flights
from Gatwick. See www.thomascook.com

Kos

A seven-night stay at the Gaia Village Hotel in Tingaki, Kos, costs from £201
per person, based on a May 12 departure. Price includes flights from
Stansted. See www.lowcostholidays.com

Corfu

Save £224 per person with a one-week stay at the self-catering Lena Studios
near Sidari, in Corfu. Seven nights costs £329.50 per person, including
flights from Gatwick, based on an August 6 departure. See holidays.monarch.co.uk

A seven-night stay at the Villa Olga, in the fishing village of Kassiopi,
Corfu, costs from £195 per person, including flights from Birmingham, based
on a May 14 departure. See www.cosmos.co.uk.

Santorini

One week at the three-star Levante Hotel in Santorini costs from £273 per
person, including flights from Gatwick, based on a May 8 departure. See www.manos.co.uk.

Skiathos

Seven night’s bed and breakfast at the Kassandra Bay Hotel in Skiathos costs
from £479 per person, including flights, based on a June 8 departure. See www.holidayshed.com


France, Greece Elections Expected to Disrupt Stocks

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Huge discounts offered on holidays to Greece

Meanwhile, a week in Zakynthos with Cosmos Holidays costs from £168 per
person, two weeks in Sami with Manos – a subsidiary of Thomas Cook – starts
at £353, while seven nights at a four-star hotel in Kos can be secured for
£201 per person when booked through Lowcostholidays.com.

Noel Josephides, the managing director of Sunvil Holidays, in an interview
with Travel Trade Gazette, described the price of some Greek holidays as
“ridiculous”.

“We are treading water on Greece,” he said. “We have stabilised in the past
few weeks, but we have not made up everything that we lost since the Foreign
Secretary said that Britons may have to be evacuated.”

Although there are no restrictions on Britons visiting Greece, the Foreign
Office warns holidaymakers there to expect regular strikes, occasionally
violent demonstrations and disruption to public transport. See fco.gov.uk
for more information.

Ten of the best deals to Greece

Mykonos

Save 25 per cent on a one-week stay at the five-star La Residence in Mykonos.
Seven night’s accommodation, including flights, transfers, breakfast,
champagne on arrival and a three-course dinner, costs from £619 per person,
based on selected dates until October 7. Book by April 29. See www.hand-picked.telegraph.co.uk

Kefalonia

A seven-night stay at the self-catering Marketos Studios in Svoronata,
Kefalonia, costs £309.50 per person (was £705.50), including flights
from Gatwick. Price is based on a July 1 departure. See holidays.monarch.co.uk

One week at the self-catering three-star Mythos Apartments in Kefalonia costs
from £147 per person, including flights, based on a May 8 departure. See olympicholidays.com

Zakynthos

Two weeks at the three-star Vasilikos Beach Hotel costs from £353 per
person, based on a May 17 departure. Prices include flights from Gatwick.
See www.manos.co.uk.

Pefkos

One week at the self-catering Stella Apartments in Pefkos costs from £131 per
person (was £806), based on a May 12 departure. The price includes flights
from Gatwick. See www.thomascook.com

Kos

A seven-night stay at the Gaia Village Hotel in Tingaki, Kos, costs from £201
per person, based on a May 12 departure. Price includes flights from
Stansted. See www.lowcostholidays.com

Corfu

Save £224 per person with a one-week stay at the self-catering Lena Studios
near Sidari, in Corfu. Seven nights costs £329.50 per person, including
flights from Gatwick, based on an August 6 departure. See holidays.monarch.co.uk

A seven-night stay at the Villa Olga, in the fishing village of Kassiopi,
Corfu, costs from £195 per person, including flights from Birmingham, based
on a May 14 departure. See www.cosmos.co.uk.

Santorini

One week at the three-star Levante Hotel in Santorini costs from £273 per
person, including flights from Gatwick, based on a May 8 departure. See www.manos.co.uk.

Skiathos

Seven night’s bed and breakfast at the Kassandra Bay Hotel in Skiathos costs
from £479 per person, including flights, based on a June 8 departure. See www.holidayshed.com


Mykonos Accommodation Center Welcomes You for the Summer of 2012: Check the Latest News About Mykonos Island Tourism & Explore the Up-to-Date Website

Mykonos Island, Greece, April 27, 2012 –(PR.com)– Mykonos Island with its superb beaches, top accommodation, multitude of good restaurants and coffee-shops, vibrant night-life, and international style shopping, is the perfect choice for your memorable holidays.

Mykonos Accommodation Center member of ASTA IGLTA offers expert local knowledge top quality service to both independent travellers travel agencies worldwide for Mykonos hotels, resorts, apartments, luxury villas, plus direct flights from/to all over Europe, car rental, excursions cruises…all in real time!

Browse our main index of all types of accommodation lodging on Mykonos, find our complete choice of reservations for the rest of Greece, choose from all other travel services, bookings things to do on Mykonos Island or keep your self up to date by checking the latest News about Mykonos Island at www.mykonos-accommodation.com/news.htm