Cheapflights.co.uk finds destination diversity is travel’s latest trend



Cheapflights.co.uk

reveals that travellers continue to travel in spite of a dire economy, casting their net further afield to pound-stretching destinations and new adventures.

In its latest Rising Stars report, Cheapflights.co.uk, the UK’s leading website for flight deals comparison, compares the difference in search volume on its site for the first six months of 2011 compared with those of 2010.

The list of 25 ranks the top five climbers for each of five continents: Europe, Asia/Oceania, North America, South America and Africa. Topping the list in first place is Bodrum in Turkey with a staggering 971 percent increase. In an unexpected second place is Iraq’s town of Erbil, which experienced 504 percent growth, while Hawaii’s sunny Kona comes in third at 110 percent increase. The Far East wins both fourth and fifth place with Hangzhou, China, and Sapporo, Japan increasing by 87 and 80 percent respectively.

“The trend shows that travel is still a priority even if budgets are tight. Continued economic slowdown has only served to create new destination trends with consumers literally willing to go the distance in places that will stretch their pounds,” says Nadine Hallak, Travel Expert for Cheapflights.co.uk.

“With its relative stability, northern Iraq first attracted business travellers, but now increased flights to the destination and development in the way of hospitality and hotels, has begun to draw intrepid tourists as well,” adds Hallak.

Turkey, a long time holiday favourite for Brits, is profiting from tourism opportunities more than ever this year. Those formerly bound for Egypt and Tunisia have turned their sights over to resort towns like Bodrum, for a similar offering in a more stable climate. Low ground costs also continue to serve as a clear example of consumers seeking great value for less.

Japan and China draw travellers for their great shopping and cultural offerings. As new places open for business, people are more open to trying them for tourism purposes. Evidence of this is clear further down the destinations list with Bujumbra, Burundi rising by 73 percent, Port Harcourt, Nigeria at 44 percent, and Bulawayo, Zimbabwe at 40 percent.

Another surprise, ranking in 15th place is Zakynthos, Greece, which has risen by 25 percent year on year. Hit hard by recession, the country slashed its prices, particularly over the summer, by up to 50 and 60 percent. Travellers flocked to its sunny shores for heavily discounted all-inclusive holidays in four and five star resorts.


TRAVPR.COM DISCOVER HOLIDAYS TO MADEIRA WITH SUNVIL DISCOVERY

09.27.2011– (TRAVPR.COM) UK – September 27th, 2011 – Find the real country with Sunvil – the Cherimoya Fruit Festival, Madeira from £603!

Not familiar with the cherimoya? The locals of the beautiful small village of Faial, Madeira certainly are… Otherwise known as the custard apple, the cherimoya is a soft, sweet fruit – its flavour a blend of banana, pineapple, papaya, peach and strawberry. Faial is the centre of cherimoya growing in Madeira and so to promote this delicious fruit, local producers have created a festival with a fruit exhibition and great entertainment.

Join the celebrations from 11-12th February 2011 in the beautiful small village of Faial, staying at the island’s capital, Funchal, with Sunvil Discovery – experts in tailor-made travel to off-the-beaten track destinations.

Five nights’ BB at Quinta Bela Sao Tiago cost from £603 pp (two sharing) including return flights (Heathrow) and transfers.

Book through AITO* member Sunvil Discovery (020 8758 4722; www.sunvil.co.uk)

About Sunvil Discovery

Freedom, flexibility and independence are at the heart of every Sunvil Discovery holiday. Destinations featured include The Azores, Italy Sicily, Portugal Madeira, Scandinavia and Romania. Fly-drives, tailor-made trips, short breaks and multi-centre itineraries are all possible, and the emphasis is on responsible holidays to off-the-beaten-track areas in accommodation that ranges from historic pousadas, agriturismo (in Italy), hotels and self-catering properties.

Parent company Sunvil began as a small tour operator featuring solely Cyprus in 1970; it now produces 11 brochures a year, plus some web-only programmes, to a range of destinations worldwide including Greece. Based in Isleworth, Middlesex, Sunvil has always stayed true to its original mission to provide sustainable, low-volume, low-impact tourism to areas off the beaten track. Sister companies include GIC The Villa Collection, Expert Africa and Wild About Africa.

###

CONTACT INFORMATION:
Contact Name: Ross – Ambergreen
Phone #: 02087584758
Email: [email protected]
Web: http://www.sunvil.co.uk


Cheapflights.co.uk Finds ‘Destination Diversity’ Is Travel’s New Black

LONDON–(Marketwire – Sep 27, 2011) – Travellers continue to travel in spite of a dire economy, casting their net further afield to Pound stretching destinations and new adventures.

In its latest Rising Stars report, Cheapflights.co.uk, the UK’s leading website for travel deals comparison, compares the difference in search volume on its site for the first six months of 2011 compared with those of 2010.

The list of 25 ranks the top five climbers for each of five continents: Europe, Asia/Oceania, North America, South America and Africa. Topping the list in first place is Bodrum in Turkey with a staggering 971 per cent increase. In a highly unexpected second place is Iraq’s town of Erbil, which experienced 504 per cent growth, while Hawaii’s sunny Kona comes in third at 110 per cent. The Far East wins both fourth and fifth place with Hangzhou, China, and Sapporo, Japan at 87 and 80 per cent respectively.

“The trend shows that travel is still a priority even if budgets are tight. Continued economic slowdown has only served to create new destination trends with consumers literally willing to go the distance in places that will stretch their Pounds,” says Nadine Hallak, Travel Expert for Cheapflights.co.uk.

“With its relative stability, northern Iraq first attracted business travellers, but now increased flights to the destination and development in the way of hospitality and hotels are beginning drawing intrepid tourists as well,” adds Hallak.

Turkey, a long time holiday favourite for Brits, is soaking up the tourism opportunities more than ever this year. Those formerly bound for Egypt and Tunisia turned their sights over to resort towns like Bodrum for a similar offering in a more stable climate. The country’s low ground costs also continue to serve as a clear example of consumers seeking great value for less.

Japan and China draw travellers for their great shopping and cultural offerings. Meanwhile, as new places open for business, people are more open to trying them for tourism purposes. Evidence of this is clear further down the destinations list with Bujumbra, Burundi rising by 73 per cent, Port Harcourt, Nigeria at 44 per cent, and Bulawayo, Zimbabwe at 40 per cent.

Another surprise, ranking in 15th place is Zakynthos, Greece, which has risen by 25 per cent year on year. Having been hit hard by recession, the country was slashing its prices, particularly over the summer, by up to 50 and 60 per cent. Travellers flocked to its sunny shores for heavily discounted all-inclusive holidays in four and five star resorts.

For the full Rising Stars report 2011, visit http://www.cheapflights.co.uk/promos/rising-stars-in-2011/.

To search and compare flight deals to these or any other destination, visit http://www.cheapflights.co.uk/

About Cheapflights Media

Cheapflights Media is an international media network helping over 11 million visitors a month find top travel deals. Our Cheapflights brand was launched in 1996 and pioneered the online comparison of flight deals for users. Today, users compare a wide range of deals from hundreds of partners including online travel agents, consolidators and airlines to find the very best flight deals. With a mission to be the starting point for travel, Cheapflights works to deliver the industry’s best airfare bargains, expert tips and inspiration. There are currently Cheapflights sites in the U.K., U.S., Canada, Germany, Australia New Zealand, France, Italy and Spain. For more information, visit www.cheapflights.co.uk. Our newest brand, Momondo, is a leading travel search engine for finding comprehensive worldwide pricing and availability on airfares. Winner of several awards, the site is ideal for users on specific travel schedules. For more information, visit www.momondo.com.


Diversity rules as Iraq joins Turkey in Cheapflights search chart

Destination diversity is the latest trend in travel, a comparison of year-on-year search statistics by flight comparison site Cheapflights.co.uk indicates.

Top five climbers include Bodrum in Turkey, Erbil in Iraq and Kona, Hawaii in the first half of the year over the same period in 2010.

Those formerly bound for Egypt and Tunisia have turned to resort towns such as Bodrum for a similar offering in a more stable climate.

Ranked in 15th place is Zakynthos in Greece, which has risen by 25% year on year. Hit hard by recession, the country slashed its prices, particularly over the summer, by up to 60%. Travellers flocked for heavily discounted all-inclusive holidays in four and five star resorts.

The company’s ‘Rising Stars’ research reveals a list of 25, ranking the top five climbers for each of five continents: Europe, Asia/Oceania, North America, South America and Africa.

Topping the list in first place is Bodrum in Turkey with a 971% increase, surprisingly followed by the Iraqi town of Erbil, which experienced 504% growth, while Hawaii’s Kona came in third at 110% increase.

The Far East wins both fourth and fifth place with Hangzhou, China, and Sapporo in Japan increasing by 87% and 80% respectively.

Cheapflights’ travel expert Nadine Hallak said: “The trend shows that travel is still a priority even if budgets are tight. Continued economic slowdown has only served to create new destination trends with consumers literally willing to go the distance in places that will stretch their pounds.

“With its relative stability, northern Iraq first attracted business travellers, but now increased flights to the destination and development in the way of hospitality and hotels, has begun to draw intrepid tourists as well.”

Japan and China draw travellers for their shopping and cultural offerings. As new places open for business, people are more open to trying them for tourism purposes.

Evidence of this is clear further down the destinations list with Bujumbra in Burundi rising by 73%, Port Harcourt, Nigeria at 44%, and Bulawayo, Zimbabwe at 40%.


Debt Crisis: European stock gain for third day in row

A strong start on Wall Street and a recovery in metal prices boosted global markets for a third day in a row as some of the nervousness over the European debt crisis eased.

A survey showing US house prices rose for the fourth month running in July helped the Dow Jones Industrial Average jump almost 2pc, adding to a 2.5pc rise yesterday, while markets in Germany and France both rose more than 4pc.

The FTSE 100 index rose by 156 points to 5,246.8 as an improvement in metal prices spurred a rush back into mining stocks.

And recent optimism that Europe’s banks will be given substantial capital injections to help them cope with a default on Greek debt added to the upbeat mood.

Mining stocks, which have slumped in recent days because of sharp falls in commodity prices, were on the front foot as prices of metals rallied.

Gold added almost $28 to 1,654 dollars per ounce, while silver and copper futures also posted strong gains.

Financial stocks were also benefiting from the improved market sentiment, with Barclays up 10p at 166p and Aviva 13.1p stronger at 308.1p.

– Philip Whiterow and Graeme Evans


Bulgarians travel abroad mostly on business: statistics

n’)
newwin.document.close()
}

function changeFontSize(i) {

tmp = document.getElementById(‘text’);
tmpsize = parseInt(tmp.style.fontSize)
newsize = tmpsize + i;
tmp.style.fontSize = newsize + ‘px’;
}

function showHideService(iId) {
var oService = document.getElementById(‘services’+iId);
if(oService.style.display == ‘block’) {
oService.style.display = ‘none’;
} else {
oService.style.display = ‘block’;
}
}

function showHideCat(oObj,iId) {

var oNewsContainer = document.getElementById(‘cat’+iId);
var oImage = document.getElementById(‘img’+iId);
if(oNewsContainer.style.display == ‘block’) {
oNewsContainer .style.display = ‘none’;
oImage.src = ‘images/arrow_close.gif’;
} else {
oNewsContainer .style.display = ‘block’;
oImage.src = ‘images/arrow_open.gif’;
}
}

function tab(obj,sId) {

document.getElementById(‘history’).style.display = ‘none’;
document.getElementById(‘obichai’).style.display = ‘none’;
document.getElementById(‘calendar’).style.display = ‘none’;
document.getElementById(sId).style.display = ‘block’;
if(sId == ‘history’) {
document.getElementById(‘tabHeadO’).className = ‘church’;
document.getElementById(‘tabHeadC’).className = ‘church’;
obj.className = ‘historyActive’;
} else {
document.getElementById(‘tabHeadH’).className = ‘history’;
document.getElementById(‘tabHeadO’).className = ‘church’;
document.getElementById(‘tabHeadC’).className = ‘church’;

obj.className = ‘churchActive’;
}

}

function updateClock ( )
{
var currentTime = new Date ( );

var currentHours = currentTime.getHours ( );
var currentMinutes = currentTime.getMinutes ( );

if(currentMinutes 90) {
o123.innerHTML = sLong.substr(0,90) + ‘…’;
}
} else {
oNewsContainer.style.display = ‘block’;
obj.className = ‘connectedHeadActive’;
oDate.className = ‘moreDateActive’;
oDot.className = ‘dotActive’;
o123.innerHTML = sLong;
}

}

Focus News
Radio Focus
Focus Sport
Focus Livescore
Focus press
Focus Army

Balkan war
Bulgarian Fight flags
AIDS – news



focus mobile : mobile version


Picture: FOCUS News Agency

Bulgarians travel abroad mostly on business: statistics

Sofia. Bulgarians’ trips abroad are 398,000 in August 2011, or 4.8% more in comparison with August 2010, announced Bulgaria’s National Statistical Institute.
There is a rise in Bulgarians’ trips to the following countries: Greece (28.2%), Romania (19.6%), Israel (10.4%), Slovakia (9.3%), Italy (8.5%), Russia (7.2%), Switzerland (5.4%), Czech Republic (4.7%), Norway (4.2%), Sweden (4%), Slovenia (2.9%) and others.
There is an increase in the trips to: Canada (19.9%), Portugal (16.9%), Cyprus (15.9%), U.S. (14.9%), Ukraine (9.2%), Malta (8.7%), Turkey (7.4%) and others.
Business trips account for the largest share – 38.1%.
Visits, education, attendance of cultural and sports events and others are 34.8%, while holidays are 27.1%.
Foreigners’ visits to Bulgaria are 1,585,900 in August 2011 and a drop of 0.7% is registered against the same month of 2010. The biggest rise is recorded with foreign holidaymakers – 1.4%.

Bulgarian watchdog backs sale of cigarette maker
Sofia. Bulgaria’s anti-monopoly watchdog gave the green light to a EUR 100 million sale of state cigarette maker Bulgartabac to a unit of Russian bank VTB, Reuters informed.
Bulgaria ups natural gas price by 6.67% as of Oct 1
Sofia. Bulgaria ups natural gas price by 6.67% as of October 1, FOCUS News Agency reported, citing State Energy and Water Regulatory Commission Chairman Angel Semerdzhiev.
Bulgarians travel abroad mostly on business: statistics
Sofia. Bulgarians’ trips abroad are 398,000 in August 2011, or 4.8% more in comparison with August 2010, announced Bulgaria’s National Statistical Institute.

of the day 81


Egypt cancels decision on visas before travel

NEW YORK/BRUSSELS (Reuters) – Euro-zone officials are working to magnify the firepower of the region’s rescue fund, European Central Bank policymakers said on Monday, while President Barack Obama piled on pressure for Europe to staunch a sovereign debt crisis that threatens the world economy.


Greek police protest troika, German and French embassies

The very people who have been charged with protecting the Greek parliament and politicians from furious crowds and who have even been criticised by Amnesty International for their heavy-handedness, the Greek police, have themselves now begun to protest EU-IMF austerity.

On Monday, police from the Special Guards unit climbed Mount Lycabettus, the highest point in Athens, to hang a giant black banner underneath the hill’s famous Chapel of St. George saying “Pay day, day of mourning”.

Some 50 striking police officers protected the banner from police who remained in service and who had been sent to tear the banner down.

Troops of police have also protested outside European Commission offices in the capital and the German and French embassies, with a banner reading: “Troikans Out!” and another from the Pan-Hellenic Federation of Police Officers declaring in English: “Greeks do not negotiate our national dignity.”

”We will not become escorts for drug-addict politicians to get their latest dose,” said another in reference the police operation in June providing protection from mass protests for MPs to be able enter parliament to pass austerity measures. The Greek term for a tranche of a loan and for a dose of drugs is the same word.

The officers complain of cuts in wages and forced unpaid leave. Monday was a scheduled pay-day, but some wages are being withheld as part of a special ‘solidarity tax’ imposed on public sector workers.

They have said they intend to “massively” participate alongside other civil servant protests. Further police protests are scheduled for Tuesday evening near the parliament.

An angry declaration on the police union website from warned of an “escalation of our struggle” and that the security forces would “not uncritically accept the directives from emanating from the IMF, the European Union and the powerful countries.”

“We refuse to accept government conditions for occupiers of our land.”

The police demonstrations came amid further industrial action by transport workers on Monday, with Athens metro, tram and suburban rail halted for 24 hours. Buses and trolleys workers downed tools for a number of hours and air traffic controllers took work-to-rule action.

Transport workers have called a two-day strike later this week. A public-sector strike has been announced for 5 October while an all-sector general strike is to be held on 19 October.

On Sunday, riot police used tear gas to clear thousands of protestors from Syntagma Square in front of the Greek parliament. The Greek government in June was criticised by Amnesty International for its excessive use of tear gas against protestors.

The same day, some 50 students stormed state television offices aiming to broadcast a message protesting reforms to universities, cuts that have kicked of a series of sit-ins at post-secondary institutions across the country.

“There has been an occupation at the state television channel NET and we are dealing with it,” government spokesman Elias Mossialos said. The station refused the students’ demand and transmitted a travel documentary instead of the seven o’clock news.

Separately, the European Commission on Monday said that troika inspectors would still not be arriving in Athens to continue their review of the implementation of the austerity demanded by international lenders.

No date has been set, said economy spokesman Amadeu Altafaj-Tardio. An EU official later said however that the commission is “pretty confident [that they can return this week].”

“[The troika] are finalising discussions with Greece, then we can move forward,” said the official.

However, any decision on the release of the latest, €8 billion tranche of bail-out cash for the country will not be made even during a meeting of eurozone finance ministers in Luxembourg on 3 October.

The troika mission must first return to Athens, produce a compliance assessment, which must then be considered by other eurozone states before the funds can be handed over.

It will be a tight schedule, as the country is set to run out of money to pay civil servants and pensioners by the middle of next month.

Greek police protest EU-IMF austerity


Touring the Ruins of the Old Economy

Combining his easy familiarity with finance and the talents of a travel writer, Mr. Lewis sets off in these pages to give the reader a guided tour through some of the disparate places hard hit by the fiscal tsunami of 2008, like Greece, Iceland and Ireland, tracing how very different people for very different reasons gorged on the cheap credit available in the prelude to that disaster. The book — based on articles Mr. Lewis wrote for Vanity Fair magazine — is a companion piece of sorts to “The Big Short: Inside the Doomsday Machine,” his bestselling 2010 book about the fiscal crisis. Like that earlier book its focus is narrow. It doesn’t aspire to provide a broad overview of the debt crisis but instead hands the reader a small but sparkling prism by which to view the problem, this time from a global perspective.

Mr. Lewis explains why the world is so worried that Greece could default: “If Greece walks away from $400 billion in debt, then the European banks that lent the money will go down, and other countries now flirting with bankruptcy” might easily follow, destabilizing regional and world economies further. He also explains why taxpayers in Germany — the euro zone’s largest economy, with resources critical to a rescue plan — are reluctant to keep bailing out other countries they regard as profligate, indolent and irresponsible.

This is why, Mr. Lewis writes, “European leaders have done nothing but delay the inevitable reckoning, by scrambling every few months to find cash to plug the ever growing holes in Greece, Ireland and Portugal, and praying that bigger and more alarming holes in Spain, Italy and even France do not reveal themselves.”

How did this situation develop? In “Boomerang” Mr. Lewis captures the utter folly and madness that spread across both sides of the Atlantic during the last decade, as individuals, institutions and entire nations mindlessly embraced instant gratification over long-term planning, the too good to be true over common sense.

Greece, Mr. Lewis writes, ran up astonishing debts — from high-paying government jobs and generous pensions, as well as waste, bribery and theft — that came to “about $1.2 trillion, or more than a quarter-million dollars for every working Greek.” In just the last 12 years, he says, “the wage bill of the Greek public sector has doubled, in real terms” with the average government job now paying almost three times the average private sector job. Those who work in jobs classified as “arduous” can retire and start collecting pensions, he adds, “as early as 55 for men and 50 for women”; more than 600 Greek professions have somehow managed “to get themselves classified as arduous: hairdressers, radio announcers, waiters, musicians, and on and on and on.”

In the prelude to the 2008 economic meltdown, Mr. Lewis reports, British investors, lured by the prospect of 14 percent annual returns, “forked over $30 billion” to dubious Icelandic banks (“$28 billion from companies and individuals and the rest from pension funds, hospitals, universities and other public institutions” including Oxford University which “alone lost $50 million”). And property-related bank losses in Ireland, according to one Irish economist cited by Mr. Lewis, now come to roughly 106 billion euros; and since, Mr. Lewis says, a “handful of Irish politicians and bankers had decided to guarantee all the debts of the biggest Irish banks,” those losses “alone would absorb every penny of Irish taxes for the next four years.”

At times Mr. Lewis can sound a lot like Evelyn Waugh: shrewd, observant and savagely judgmental, dispensing crude generalizations about other countries, even as he pokes fun at himself as a disaster tourist. He asserts that Icelanders “have a feral streak in them, like a horse that’s just pretending to be broken” and suggests that Germans are “obsessed with cleanliness and order yet harbor a secret fascination with filth and chaos” which is bound to result in “some kind of trouble.” He is perhaps toughest on his fellow Americans, concluding that the 2008 economic meltdown stemmed in large part from “people taking what they can, just because they can, without regard to the larger social consequences.”


Tourism Also A Challenge for Greece

Cairns, November 11, 2011

The 11th of the 11th. It’s always a huge day in Australian history, marking the anniversary of outlaw Ned Kelly’s hanging, PM Gough Whitlam’s sacking, and the end of World War One.

In 2011, November 11 also marks the launch of Destination Online, a new half-day event series from TravelTrends.biz for regional and secondary tourism markets.

Destination Online launches in Cairns, Far North Queensland, one of Australia’s most important tourism destinations, now at a pivotal point in its evolution.

It will explore local and national issues, marketing, distribution, and of course the Internet – an afternoon packed with speakers, panels and debate.

This first edition of Destination Online is being generously supported by Travelzoo, ensuring the cost of admission will be affordable for everyone.

The program will be revealed and bookings will open the beginning of October.

Sponsored by: